• Publications
  • Influence
Aging and Attentional Biases for Emotional Faces
TLDR
Findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information, consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.
Goal-directed memory: the role of cognitive control in older adults' emotional memory.
TLDR
It is revealed that older adults recruit cognitive control processes to strengthen positive and diminish negative information in memory, and younger adults showed no signs of using cognitive control to make their memories more positive, indicating that, for them, emotion regulation goals are not chronically activated.
Aging and emotional memory: the forgettable nature of negative images for older adults.
TLDR
The relative number of negative images compared with positive and neutral images recalled decreased with each successively older age group, and recognition memory showed a similar decrease with age in the relative memory advantage for negative pictures.
Emotional Arousal and Memory Binding: An Object-Based Framework
  • M. Mather
  • Psychology, Biology
    Perspectives on psychological science : a journal…
  • 1 March 2007
TLDR
Evidence for both arousal-impaired and arousal-enhanced memory binding is reviewed and contradictory findings using an object-based framework, which helps predict which aspects of emotional memories are likely to be accurate and which aspects arelikely to be misremembered.
Arousal-Biased Competition in Perception and Memory
TLDR
Arousal-biased competition theory provides specific predictions about when arousal will enhance memory for events and when it will impair it, which accounts for some puzzling contradictions in the emotional memory literature.
Amygdala Responses to Emotionally Valenced Stimuli in Older and Younger Adults
TLDR
Both older and younger adults showed greater activation in the amygdala for emotional than for neutral pictures; however, for older adults, seeing positive pictures led to greater amygdala activation than seeing negative pictures, whereas this was not the case for younger adults.
Aging and goal-directed emotional attention: distraction reverses emotional biases.
TLDR
Replicating previous eye-tracking findings, older adults allocated less of their visual attention to negative stimuli in negative-neutral stimulus pairings in the full attention condition than younger adults did, and older adults' tendency to avoid negative stimuli was reversed in the divided attention condition.
The emotion paradox in the aging brain
  • M. Mather
  • Psychology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1 March 2012
This paper reviews age differences in emotion processing and how they may relate to age‐related changes in the brain. Compared with younger adults, older adults react less to negative situations,
Angry faces get noticed quickly: threat detection is not impaired among older adults.
TLDR
There was no age difference in this threat-detection advantage, indicating that this automatic process is maintained among older adults.
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