• Publications
  • Influence
Investigation of Head Injury Mechanisms Using Neutral Density Technology and High-Speed Biplanar X-ray.
TLDR
The principal focus of this study was the measurement of relative brain motion with respect to the skull using a high-speed, biplanar x-ray system and neutral density targets (NDTs) and results can be used to further finite-element modeling efforts. Expand
A study of the response of the human cadaver head to impact.
TLDR
High-speed biplane x-ray and neutral density targets were used to examine brain displacement and deformation during impact and can be used for the validation of finite element models of the human head. Expand
Middle ear structures in fossorial mammals: a comparison with non‐fossorial species
TLDR
The middle ear ossicles of fossorial rodents, talpid moles and some golden moles were not found to differ in mass from those of non-fossorial mammals of similar body size, but the middle ear structure alone does not seem to explain the restricted hearing range observed in certain of these species. Expand
A bony connection signals laryngeal echolocation in bats
TLDR
It is demonstrated that proximal articulation of the stylohyal bone (part of the mammalian hyoid apparatus) with the tympanic bone always distinguishes laryngeally echolocating bats from all other bats (that is, non-echolocating pteropodids and those that e cholocate with tongue clicks). Expand
Pathways for Sound Transmission to the Inner Ear in Amphibians
TLDR
Adaptations in frogs and other tetrapods might well be analogous rather than homologous, allowing one to examine critically assumptions about what is required of an ear. Expand
Evolution of the middle ear apparatus in talpid moles
  • M. Mason
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of morphology
  • 1 March 2006
TLDR
Differences in middle ear morphology within members of the Talpidae are correlated with lifestyle: the species with middle ears closer to the ancestral type spend more time above ground, where they will be exposed to high‐frequency sound: their middle ears appear suited for transmission of high frequencies. Expand
Of mice, moles and guinea pigs: Functional morphology of the middle ear in living mammals
  • M. Mason
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Hearing Research
  • 1 July 2013
TLDR
A more rigorous comparative approach and a better appreciation of the complex patterns of convergent and divergent evolution reflected in the middle ear structures of living mammals are also needed, in order to put findings from different species into the appropriate context. Expand
Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. II: Inferring function from structure
  • M. Mason
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of anatomy
  • 1 February 2016
TLDR
An introduction to middle ear function targetted towards biological scientists with little experience in the field of auditory acoustics, showing that functional inferences based on middle ear anatomy are more likely to be valid at low frequencies. Expand
Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. I: Large middle ears in small desert mammals
  • M. Mason
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of anatomy
  • 1 February 2016
TLDR
While Macroscelides was found here to have middle ear cavities so large that together they exceed brain volume, the bullae of Elephantulus are considerably smaller, but it may relate to microhabitat. Expand
Morphology of the middle ear of golden moles (Chrysochloridae)
TLDR
It is proposed that adaptations towards low-frequency airborne hearing might have predisposed golden moles towards the evolution of seismic sensitivity through inertial bone conduction and the morphology of the middle ear apparatus sheds little light on the disputed ordinal position of the Chrysochloridae. Expand
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