• Publications
  • Influence
Recovery of Rare Earths, Precious Metals and Bioreduction of Toxic Metals from Wastewater Using Algae
For many decades, toxicity of metals has been recognised due to documented evidence in plants, animals, water and/or humans. Unlike toxic heavy metals which are relatively abundant, some metals are
Cr(VI) mediated hydrolysis of algae cell walls to release TOC for enhanced biotransformation of Cr(VI) by a culture of Cr(VI) reducing bacteria
Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], the most toxic form of chromium, is frequently released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Cr(VI) mainly occurs in the oxyanionic forms, CrO42− and
Bacterial cr(vi) reduction with internal carbon recirculation using freshwater algae as primary producers
Chromium exits naturally in two oxidation states: hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). Cr(VI) is carcinogenic and mutagenic to living organisms and Cr(III) is 100 times less
Comparison of the performance of Chlorococcum ellipsoideum and Tetradesmus obliquus as a carbon source for reduction of Cr(VI) with bacteria
Chromium (Cr) is used in a variety of metallurgical, refractory and chemical processes, as well as in industrial activities such as the refining of ore, the production of steel and alloys, metal
Correction to: Cr(VI) mediated hydrolysis of algae cell walls to release TOC for enhanced biotransformation of Cr(VI) by a culture of Cr(VI) reducing bacteria
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake
The Cr(VI) Bioremediation Potential of Chlamydomonas Debaryana
TLDR
Assessment of the Cr(VI) tolerance of C. debaryana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii shows that C.debaryana might be better suited to use in cooperation with CRB for Cr( VI) treatment in a biofilm reactor, which can lead to an improved treatment set up for Cr (VI) pollution that requires fewer chemical and energy inputs and produces less secondary waste.