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Mechanism of extrasynaptic dopamine signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans
TLDR
The results indicate that extrasynaptic dopamine regulates C. elegans locomotion through D1- and D2-like receptors that activate the antagonistic Gαq and Gαo signaling pathways, respectively. Expand
The drosophila EcR gene encodes an ecdysone receptor, a new member of the steroid receptor superfamily
TLDR
The steroid hormone ecdysone triggers coordinate changes in Drosophila tissue development that result in metamorphosis and a gene, EcR, is isolated and characterized for a new steroid receptor homolog and it is shown that it encodes an ecDysone receptor. Expand
EGL-10 Regulates G Protein Signaling in the C. elegans Nervous System and Shares a Conserved Domain with Many Mammalian Proteins
TLDR
Two previously known and 13 newly identified mammalian genes have similarity to egl-10 and SST2, and it is proposed that members of this family regulate many G protein signaling pathways. Expand
Biogenic amine neurotransmitters in C. elegans.
  • D. Chase, M. Koelle
  • Biology, Medicine
  • WormBook : the online review of C. elegans…
  • 20 February 2007
TLDR
Dopamine and serotonin act through receptors and downstream signaling mechanisms similar to those that operate in the mammalian brain suggesting that C. elegans will provide a valuable model for understanding biogenic amine signaling in the brain. Expand
Genetic and Cellular Basis for Acetylcholine Inhibition of Caenorhabditis elegans Egg-Laying Behavior
TLDR
Results show that acetylcholine released from the VC neurons inhibits egg-laying behavior, which may be caused, in part, by acetylCholine signaling onto the HSN presynaptic terminals, via GAR-2, to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Expand
Antagonism between Goα and Gqα in Caenorhabditis elegans: the RGS protein EAT-16 is necessary for Goα signaling and regulates Gqα activity
TLDR
It is proposed that a major cellular role of Go is to antagonize signaling by Gq, and that Goα negatively regulates the Gq pathway, possibly via EAT-16 or SAG-1. Expand
Antagonism between G(o)alpha and G(q)alpha in Caenorhabditis elegans: the RGS protein EAT-16 is necessary for G(o)alpha signaling and regulates G(q)alpha activity.
TLDR
Double-mutant analysis indicates that both sag-1 and eat-16 act downstream of, or parallel to, G(o)alpha and negatively regulate EGL-30 (G(q)alpha) signaling, and it is proposed that a major cellular role of G(O) is to antagonize signaling by G(q). Expand
Biogenic amine neurotransmitters in C.
TLDR
Dopamine and serotonin act through receptors and downstream signaling mechanisms similar to those that operate in the mammalian brain suggesting that C. elegans will provide a valuable model for understanding biogenic amine signaling in the brain. Expand
A new family of G-protein regulators - the RGS proteins.
  • M. Koelle
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Current opinion in cell biology
  • 1 April 1997
TLDR
The first biochemical studies of RGS proteins have shown that they accelerate the GTPase activities of G-protein alpha subunits, thus driving G proteins into their inactive GDP-bound forms. Expand
A Specific Subset of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-Type Channel Subunits in Caenorhabditis elegans Endocrine Cells Function as Mixed Heteromers to Promote Neurotransmitter Release
TLDR
The results identify a specific set of heteromeric TRPV channels that redundantly regulate neuroendocrine function and show that a subunit combination that functions in sensory neurons is also present in neuro endocrine cells but has no detectable function in these cells. Expand
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