• Publications
  • Influence
Historical Overfishing and the Recent Collapse of Coastal Ecosystems
Ecological extinction caused by overfishing precedes all other pervasive human disturbance to coastal ecosystems, including pollution, degradation of water quality, and anthropogenic climate change.
Depletion, Degradation, and Recovery Potential of Estuaries and Coastal Seas
TLDR
Reconstructed time lines, causes, and consequences of change in 12 once diverse and productive estuaries and coastal seas worldwide show similar patterns: Human impacts have depleted >90% of formerly important species, destroyed >65% of seagrass and wetland habitat, degraded water quality, and accelerated species invasions.
Lower Miocene Stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and Its Bearing on the Central American Peninsula
TLDR
The new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a peninsula connected to northern Central America and North America for much of the Miocene, which has profound implications for the understanding of the tectonic, climatic, oceanographic and biogeographic history related to the formation of the Isthmus of Panama.
Fishing down the coast: historical expansion and collapse of oyster fisheries along continental margins.
  • M. Kirby
  • Environmental Science, History
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…
  • 31 August 2004
TLDR
This work evaluates the expansion and collapse of oyster fisheries in 28 estuaries along three continental margins through the analysis of historical proxies derived from fishery records to infer when oyster reefs were degraded.
Stable isotope sclerochronology of Pleistocene and Recent oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica)
TLDR
Examining delta 18 O and delta 13 C profiles across ligamental increments found in Crassostrea virginica shells from the recent of Terrebonne Bay, Mississippi Delta, and the Pleistocene of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia demonstrates that stable isotope sclerochronology of oyster shells facilitates the interpretation of past estuarine environments and oyster life histories.
Paleoecological Differences Between Tertiary and Quaternary Crassostrea Oysters, as Revealed by Stable Isotope Sclerochronology
  • M. Kirby
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 1 April 2000
Abstract Tertiary Crassostrea oysters grew large and thick shells, whereas their descendants, living Crassostrea, grow comparatively smaller and thinner shells. To test for ecological differences
THE EMPERADOR LIMESTONE REDISCOVERED: EARLY MIOCENE CORALS FROM THE CULEBRA FORMATION, PANAMA
Abstract Caribbean reefs underwent significant biotic change during the Late Oligocene and Early Miocene. This was a critical time in the evolution of the modern Caribbean fauna characterized by
Differences in growth rate and environment between Tertiary and Quaternary Crassostrea oysters
  • M. Kirby
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Paleobiology
  • 1 December 2001
TLDR
Results are consistent with the hypothesis that thicker shells in Tertiary Crassostrea titan deterred increased exposure to fully marine predation and suggest that estuaries have served as refugia from which populations have dispersed into fully marine environments multiple times through the Cenozoic.
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