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Implications of the mastoid anatomy of larger extant felids for the evolution and predatory behaviour of sabretoothed cats (Mammalia, Carnivora, Felidae)
TLDR
This study supports the inference by W. Akersten that the main muscles inserting in the mastoid process in sabretooths were those originating in the atlas, rather than those from the posterior neck, sternum and forelimb, and implies larger and longer-fibred atlanto-mastoid muscles than in pantherines. Expand
A new tribe, new genus and two new species of Barbourofelinae (Felidae, Carnivora, Mammalia) from the Early Miocene of East Africa and Spain
TLDR
A new genus and species of felid, Ginsburgsmilus napakensis, is described from Napak, Uganda and a close relationship is proposed between these two genera and the tribe Barbourofelini, the transition between the two being represented in the fossil record by Prosansanosmilus peregrinus Heizmann et al. 1980. Expand
Aspects of the functional morphology in the cranial and cervical skeleton of the sabre‐toothed cat Paramachairodus ogygia (Kaup, 1832) (Felidae, Machairodontinae) from the Late Miocene of Spain:
The skull and cervical anatomy of the sabre-toothed felid Paramachairodus ogygia (Kaup, 1832) is described in this paper, with special attention paid to its functional morphology. Because of theExpand
Implications of the functional anatomy of the hand and forearm of Ailurus fulgens (Carnivora, Ailuridae) for the evolution of the ‘false‐thumb’ in pandas
TLDR
The functional anatomy of this structure in the red panda is studied, comparing it with existing descriptions of the grasping mechanism in both pandas, and it is shown that previous interpretations of the radial sesamoid in Ailurus as a rod‐like structure without direct articulation to the wrist bones are inaccurate. Expand
A complete skull of Chasmaporthetes lunensis (Carnivora, Hyaenidae) from the Spanish Pliocene site of La Puebla de Valverde (Teruel)
TLDR
Overall, the available evidence suggests that C. lunensis was an active, group hunting predator of medium-sized ungulates, able to fully utilize carcasses but less dedicated to scavenging than the contemporary species P. perrieri. Expand
Evidence of a false thumb in a fossil carnivore clarifies the evolution of pandas.
TLDR
It seems that, whereas the false thumb of the giant panda probably evolved for manipulating bamboo, the false thumbs of the red panda and of S. batalleri more likely evolved as an aid for arboreal locomotion, with thered panda secondarily developing its ability for item manipulation and thus producing one of the most dramatic cases of convergence among vertebrates. Expand
FIRST KNOWN COMPLETE SKULLS OF THE SCIMITAR-TOOTHED CAT MACHAIRODUS APHANISTUS (FELIDAE, CARNIVORA) FROM THE SPANISH LATE MIOCENE SITE OF BATALLONES-1
TLDR
Differences in cranial morphology suggest separation at the generic level between M. aphanistus and M. giganteus, suggesting that the specialized canines of M. ansonistus were used within the context of a biting mechanism more similar to the canine bite of modern felids. Expand
The evolution of the bone-cracking model in carnivorans: cranial functional morphology of the Plio-Pleistocene cursorial hyaenid Chasmaporthetes lunensis (Mammalia: Carnivora)
TLDR
A functional morphological analysis of the cranium of the cursorial meat-and-bone specialist Chasmaporthetes lunensis is conducted by using finite element modeling to compare it with the living Crocuta crocuta, a well-known bone-cracking carnivoran. Expand
Changing ideas about the evolution and functional morphology of Machairodontine felids
Sabre-toothed felids, the machairodontines, have attracted much attention among palaeontologists for many decades, not only because of their spectacular morphology but also because they are aExpand
Functional anatomy and biomechanics of the postcranial skeleton of Simocyon batalleri (Viret, 1929) (Carnivora, Ailuridae) from the Late Miocene of Spain
TLDR
The morphology of the forelimb, the lumbar region and the unexpected presence of a false-thumb are strongly suggestive of arboreal capabilities, consistent with a palaeobiological model of a generalized carnivore that foraged mainly on the ground but could readily climb to trees for safety if faced with the threat of larger competing carnivores. Expand
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