• Publications
  • Influence
Animals in a bacterial world, a new imperative for the life sciences
TLDR
Recent technological and intellectual advances that have changed thinking about five questions about how have bacteria facilitated the origin and evolution of animals; how do animals and bacteria affect each other’s genomes; how does normal animal development depend on bacterial partners; and how is homeostasis maintained between animals and their symbionts are highlighted. Expand
Biofilms and marine invertebrate larvae: what bacteria produce that larvae use to choose settlement sites.
  • M. Hadfield
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of marine science
  • 2011
TLDR
Research on the tube-dwelling polychaete worm Hydroides elegans is described to exemplify approaches to understanding biofilm bacteria as a source of settlement cues and larvae as bearers of receptors for bacterial cues. Expand
What is metamorphosis?
TLDR
This article is presented as an introduction to this symposium volume, but also as a reference tool that can be used by others interested in metamorphosis, to represent a springboard for further investigations into the surprisingly deep mechanistic similarities among independently evolved life cycle transitions across kingdoms. Expand
EXCESS POTASSIUM INDUCES LARVAL METAMORPHOSIS IN FOUR MARINE INVERTEBRATE SPECIES
TLDR
The ability of K+ to directly influence cell membrane potential is proposed as an explanation for its broad effectiveness as a metamorphic inducer for larvae that recruit to different habitats. Expand
Metamorphic Competence, a Major Adaptive Convergence in Marine Invertebrate Larvae
TLDR
Competent larvae of two “model marine invertebrates” studied in the authors' laboratory, the serpulid polychaete Hydroides elegans and the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae, complete metamorphosis in about 12 and 20 hr, respectively; little or no de novo gene action appears to be required during the metamorphic induction process in these species. Expand
The apical sensory organ of a gastropod veliger is a receptor for settlement cues.
TLDR
Results demonstrate that (1) the ASO-ablated larvae have not lost the ability to metamorphose and (2) the ions do not act only on the metamorphic-signal receptor cells, but at other sites downstream in the meetamorphic signal transduction pathway. Expand
Why and how marine-invertebrate larvae metamorphose so fast.
  • M. Hadfield
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Seminars in cell & developmental biology
  • 1 December 2000
It is argued that larviparous development has evolved at least eight times among extant animals. A 'need for speed hypothesis' is proposed to explain profound convergence on a pattern of small larvaeExpand
The Decimation of Endemic Hawai'ian Tree Snails by Alien Predators
Endemic terrestrial tree snails of the Hawai'ian Islands, like those of other oceanic islands and even some continental areas, are extremely sensitive to disturbance because of their low populationExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...