• Publications
  • Influence
Resolution of ray-finned fish phylogeny and timing of diversification
  • T. Near, R. Eytan, +6 authors W. Smith
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 6 August 2012
Ray-finned fishes make up half of all living vertebrate species. Nearly all ray-finned fishes are teleosts, which include most commercially important fish species, several model organisms forExpand
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Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes
Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorphExpand
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A new time-scale for ray-finned fish evolution
The Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) is the largest and most diverse vertebrate group, but little is agreed about the timing of its early evolution. Estimates using mitochondrial genomic dataExpand
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Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting
Cichlid fishes are a key model system in the study of adaptive radiation, speciation and evolutionary developmental biology. More than 1600 cichlid species inhabit freshwater and marginal marineExpand
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Explosive morphological diversification of spiny-finned teleost fishes in the aftermath of the end-Cretaceous extinction
  • M. Friedman
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological…
  • 7 June 2010
The spiny-finned teleost fishes (Acanthomorpha) include nearly one-third of all living vertebrate species and assume a bewildering array of bodyplans, but the macroevolutionary assembly of modernExpand
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Constraints on the timescale of animal evolutionary history
Dating the tree of life is a core endeavor in evolutionary biology. Rates of evolution are fundamental to nearly every evolutionary model and process. Rates need dates. There is much debate on theExpand
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Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction
  • M. Friedman
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 31 March 2009
Despite the attention focused on mass extinction events in the fossil record, patterns of extinction in the dominant group of marine vertebrates—fishes—remain largely unexplored. Here, I demonstrateExpand
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An inverse latitudinal gradient in speciation rate for marine fishes
Far more species of organisms are found in the tropics than in temperate and polar regions, but the evolutionary and ecological causes of this pattern remain controversial1,2. Tropical marine fishExpand
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Parallel evolutionary trajectories underlie the origin of giant suspension-feeding whales and bony fishes
  • M. Friedman
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological…
  • 7 March 2012
Giant suspension feeders such as mysticete whales, basking and whale sharks, and the extinct (indicated by ‘†’) †pachycormiform teleosts are conspicuous members of modern and fossil marine vertebrateExpand
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Extinction of fish-shaped marine reptiles associated with reduced evolutionary rates and global environmental volatility
Despite their profound adaptations to the aquatic realm and their apparent success throughout the Triassic and the Jurassic, ichthyosaurs became extinct roughly 30 million years before theExpand
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