• Publications
  • Influence
Resolution of ray-finned fish phylogeny and timing of diversification
  • T. Near, R. Eytan, +6 authors W. Smith
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 6 August 2012
Ray-finned fishes make up half of all living vertebrate species. Nearly all ray-finned fishes are teleosts, which include most commercially important fish species, several model organisms forExpand
Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes
TLDR
Analysis of clade-specific shifts in diversification rates reveal that the hyperdiversity of living acanthomorphs is highlighted by several rapidly radiating lineages including tunas, gobies, blennies, snailfishes, and Afro-American cichlids, indicating there is no single explanation for the success of acanthomorphics. Expand
A new time-scale for ray-finned fish evolution
TLDR
New palaeontological evidence is presented that the neopterygian crown radiation is a Palaeozoic event, and it is demonstrated that conflicts between molecular and morphological data for the age of the Neopterygii result, in part, from missing fossil data. Expand
Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting
TLDR
The results provide a revised macroevolutionary time scale for cichlids, imply a role for dispersal in generating the observed geographical distribution of this important model clade and add to a growing debate that questions the dominance of the vicariance paradigm of historical biogeography. Expand
An inverse latitudinal gradient in speciation rate for marine fishes
TLDR
It is shown that the fastest rates of speciation occur in species-poor regions outside the tropics, and that high-latitude fish lineages form new species at much faster rates than their tropical counterparts. Expand
Explosive morphological diversification of spiny-finned teleost fishes in the aftermath of the end-Cretaceous extinction
  • M. Friedman
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological…
  • 7 June 2010
TLDR
The trajectory of morphological diversification in this major radiation from its first appearance in the Late Cretaceous to the Miocene is reconstructed using a geometric morphometric database comprising more than 600 extinct species known from complete body fossils to suggest that multiple factors contributed to the prolific anatomical radiation of acanthomorphs. Expand
Constraints on the timescale of animal evolutionary history
TLDR
Calibrations for 88 key nodes across the phylogeny of animals, ranging from the root of Metazoa to the last common ancestor of Homo sapiens, are presented, highlighting the importance of identifying crown (not stem) fossils, levels of confidence in their attribution to the crown, current chronostratigraphic precision, the primacy of the host geological formation and asymmetric confidence intervals. Expand
Five hundred million years of extinction and recovery: a phanerozoic survey of large‐scale diversity patterns in fishes
TLDR
A broad overview of the Phanerozoic history of fish diversity is provided, placing a special emphasis on intervals of turnover, evolutionary radiation, and extinction. Expand
Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction
  • M. Friedman
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 31 March 2009
TLDR
Ecomorphological selectivity among marine teleost fishes during the end-Cretaceous extinction is demonstrated, based on a genus-level dataset that accounts for lineages predicted on the basis of phylogeny but not yet sampled in the fossil record. Expand
Styloichthys as the oldest coelacanth: Implications for early osteichthyan interrelationships
TLDR
A revised cladistic analysis places Styloichthys as the most basal coelacanth, which, if correct, fills conspicuous stratigraphic and morphological gaps in the fossil record of this clade. Expand
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