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EDHF: bringing the concepts together.
Endothelial cells synthesize and release vasoactive mediators in response to various neurohumoural substances (e.g. bradykinin or acetylcholine) and physical stimuli (e.g. cyclic stretch or fluidExpand
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Acetylcholine‐induced endothelium‐dependent contractions in the SHR aorta: the Janus face of prostacyclin
In the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and aging Wistar–Kyoto rats (WKY), acetylcholine releases an endothelium‐derived contracting factor (EDCF) produced by endothelial cyclooxygenase‐1, whichExpand
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Endothelial dysfunction: a multifaceted disorder (The Wiggers Award Lecture).
Endothelial cells synthesize and release various factors that regulate angiogenesis, inflammatory responses, hemostasis, as well as vascular tone and permeability. Endothelial dysfunction has beenExpand
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Endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factors and associated pathways: a synopsis
The term endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF) was introduced in 1987 to describe the hypothetical factor responsible for myocyte hyperpolarisations not associated with nitric oxideExpand
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Endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease
The endothelium can evoke relaxations (dilatations) of the underlying vascular smooth muscle, by releasing vasodilator substances. The best characterized endothelium‐derived relaxing factor (EDRF) isExpand
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Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor: Where Are We Now?
The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin but also by other pathways causing hyperpolarization of the underlying smooth muscle cells. ThisExpand
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EDHF: an update.
The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing NO and prostacyclin, but also by other pathways causing hyperpolarization of the underlying smooth muscle cells. This characteristic wasExpand
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Endothelium‐mediated control of vascular tone: COX‐1 and COX‐2 products
Endothelium‐dependent contractions contribute to endothelial dysfunction in various animal models of aging, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In the spontaneously hypertensive rat, the archetypalExpand
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Endothelium‐dependent contractions in hypertension
1 Endothelial cells, under given circumstances, can initiate contraction (constriction) of the vascular smooth muscle cells that surround them. Such endothelium‐dependent, acute increases inExpand
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Endothelium‐dependent hyperpolarization of canine coronary smooth muscle
1 Experiments were designed to determine whether endothelium‐dependent relaxing factor(s) released by acetylcholine from the canine femoral artery influences the membrane potential of coronaryExpand
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