• Publications
  • Influence
Reward‐Related Responses in the Human Striatum
  • M. Delgado
  • Psychology, Biology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1 May 2007
TLDR
The goal of this article is to probe the human reward circuit, specifically the striatum and its subdivisions, with an emphasis on how the affective properties of outcomes or feedback influence the underlying neural activity and subsequent decision making.
Tracking the hemodynamic responses to reward and punishment in the striatum.
TLDR
An event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm is developed to identify brain areas that are activated after presentation of a reward and shows differential responses to reward and punishment.
Perceptions of moral character modulate the neural systems of reward during the trust game
TLDR
As expected from previous studies, activation of the caudate nucleus differentiated between positive and negative feedback, but only for the 'neutral' partner, suggesting that prior social and moral perceptions can diminish reliance on feedback mechanisms in the neural circuitry of trial-and-error reward learning.
Thinking like a trader selectively reduces individuals' loss aversion
TLDR
The intentional cognitive regulation strategy, which emphasized “perspective-taking,” uniquely reduced both behavioral loss aversion and aroused to losses relative to gains, largely by influencing arousal to losses.
The Role of the Dorsal Striatum in Reward and Decision-Making
TLDR
Key evidence suggests that the dorsal striatum contributes directly to decision-making, especially to action selection and initiation, through the integration of sensorimotor, cognitive, and motivational/emotional information within specific corticostriatal circuits involving discrete regions of striatum.
Working Memory for Letters, Shapes, and Locations: fMRI Evidence against Stimulus-Based Regional Organization in Human Prefrontal Cortex
TLDR
No evidence was found to support either a left/right verbal/nonverbal WM processes or a dorsal/ventral spatial/nonspatial dissociation, and other factors that could account for the data are considered, including subjects' strategy selection, encoding of information into WM, and the nature of representational schemes in prefrontal cortex.
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