• Publications
  • Influence
Factors that impact on the safety of patient handovers: An interview study
TLDR
The organisation did not see patient handover as a critical safety point of hospitalisation, revealing that the safety culture in regard to handover was immature and the eight factors identified indicate that handovers are complex situations. Expand
Work environment influences adverse events in an emergency department.
TLDR
This study supports previous findings of severe underreporting to the mandatory national reporting system and examines the relationship between work-related stressors, safety culture and adverse events at an emergency department. Expand
Postoperative handover: characteristics and considerations on improvement A systematic review
TLDR
Postoperative handover is described as a complex work process challenged by interruptions, time pressure and a lack of supporting framework, which means that solutions are customised to fit the specific context in which the postoperative handovers takes place. Expand
Reporting adverse events in hospitals: A survey of the views of doctors and nurses on reporting practices and models of reporting
TLDR
Charles Perrow’s Normal Accidents provided a unique perspective on system safety by focusing on system shortcomings and their effects on safety, rather than the operators primarily, and influenced both students of error and accident investigators in ways that have enhanced system safety. Expand
Nurses' Views of Patient Handoffs in Japanese Hospitals
TLDR
Staff perceptions of risks associated with patient handoffs were investigated in a survey of nurses in 6 Japanese hospitals and the handoff system was identified as immature. Expand
[The attitude of doctors and nurses towards reporting and handling errors and adverse events].
TLDR
The survey shows large differences in attitudes among different staff groups towards reporting adverse events, and errors, in their reasons for not reporting and their degree of distress at the prospect of making mistakes. Expand
Patient views of adverse events: comparisons of self-reported healthcare staff attitudes with disclosure of accident information.
TLDR
Survey results of surveys in 2003 in Japan and Denmark about patients' views about adverse events show that patients were more likely to indicate negative expectations to a doctor's reactions after a medical accident when asked in general terms than whenAsked in relation to concrete case stories. Expand
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