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Keystone effects of an alien top-predator stem extinctions of native mammals
TLDR
This study provides evidence that an alien top predator can assume a keystone role and be beneficial for biodiversity conservation, and also that mammalian carnivores more generally can generate strong trophic cascades in terrestrial ecosystems. Expand
Does a top-predator provide an endangered rodent with refuge from an invasive mesopredator?
TLDR
This study investigated how the abundance of an endangered rodent Notomys fuscus is affected by Australia's largest predator, the dingo Canis lupus dingo, introduced mesopredators, introduced herbivores, kangaroos and rainfall to suggest top-order predators, such as dingoes, could have an important functional role in broad-scale biodiversity conservation programmes. Expand
Diet and prey selectivity of three species of sympatric mammalian predators in central Australia
TLDR
Investigating the diets of the feral cat, red fox, and dingo in the Simpson Desert of central Australia, over a 1-year period between 2011 and 2012 found that cats showed the greatest consumption of small mammals, whereas dingoes consumed larger prey, thus indicating preferences for different prey sizes. Expand
Managing conflict between large carnivores and livestock
TLDR
A meta-analysis of global research on conflict mitigation related to large carnivores and humans suggests coexistence strategies be location-specific, incorporate cultural values and environmental conditions, and be designed such that return on financial investment can be evaluated. Expand
Geographical gradients in seed mass in relation to climate
TLDR
The empirical results support the hypotheses that seed mass is larger at low latitudes and in the interior of the Australian continent due to increased metabolic costs at high temperatures, and that higher levels of solar radiation result in an increase in the availability of photosynthate, which in turn leads to a increase in biomass for the production of large seeds. Expand
An updated description of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793)
TLDR
A description of the dingo is provided based on pre-20th century specimens that are unlikely to have been influenced by hybridization and places morphological limits on what can be considered a dingo. Expand
Photoperiod as a reproductive cue in the marsupial genus Antechinus : ecological and evolutionary consequences
TLDR
It is suggested that photoperiodic cues allow females to produce young during seasons when food is most reliable and abundant and their energetic demands are maximal; facilitate allochronic isolation between sympatric congeners, and maximize body size differences and hence ecological separation between species. Expand
The diet of the re-introduced greater bilby Macrotis lagotis in the mallee woodlands of western New South Wales
TLDR
These results identify key components of the diet of the first population of bilbies in New South Wales since the early 20th century and, combined with detailed studies of habitat requirements and prey abundance, should assist with selection of new species. Expand
Size breeds success: multiple paternity, multivariate selection and male semelparity in a small marsupial, Antechinus stuartii
TLDR
Investigation of selection in male brown antechinus, Antechinus stuartii, and paternity success in 119 males is found to be related most strongly to body mass and scrotal size, thus providing support for both hypotheses for the evolution of semelparity. Expand
Dietary overlap and prey selectivity among sympatric carnivores: could dingoes suppress foxes through competition for prey?
TLDR
The results support the notions that dingoes could suppress fox populations through both dietary competition and direct killing and that this suppression of foxes could benefit small prey. Expand
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