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Drosophila Cuticular Hydrocarbons Revisited: Mating Status Alters Cuticular Profiles
TLDR
It is suggested that focusing on individual compounds will not provide a satisfactory understanding of the evolution and function of chemical communication in Drosophila and that the chemical conversation between male and female flies is far more complex than is generally accepted.
An Inhibitory Sex Pheromone Tastes Bitter for Drosophila Males
TLDR
Using behavioral and electrophysiological measures of responses to natural and synthetic compounds, it is shown that Z-7-tricosene, a Drosophila male cuticular hydrocarbon, acts as a sex pheromone and inhibits male-male courtship, and that the inhibitory phersomone tastes bitter to the fly.
Genetic elimination of known pheromones reveals the fundamental chemical bases of mating and isolation in Drosophila.
TLDR
The absence of inhibitory pheromones leads to high levels of interspecific mating, suggesting an important role for these cuticular hydrocarbons in isolation between species.
Species-specific effects of single sensillum ablation on mating position in Drosophila
TLDR
The existence of major differences in the sensory bases of mating position and copulation success in closely related species shows how differing mating positions may have evolved and underlines the need for detailed functional studies in studying the evolution of insect genitalia.
Darwinism's Struggle for Survival: Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection
TLDR
The aim of this book is to establish the possibility of natural selection: the confrontation of Darwinism and Mendelism and the place of selection in theoretical population genetics.
What and how do maggots smell?
TLDR
A neuroanatomical model of olfactory processing is presented, together with perspectives for future research, emphasising the importance of studying the ecology of the species under investigation.
Incipient speciation in Drosophila melanogaster involves chemical signals
TLDR
The results show that flies' cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) were involved in this sexual isolation, but that visual and acoustic signals were not, and represents a step forward in understanding of the sensory processes involved in the classic case of incipient speciation.
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