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Inclusive fitness theory and eusociality
Arising from M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita & E. O. Wilson 466, 1057–1062 (2010)10.1038/nature09205; Nowak et al. replyNowak et al. argue that inclusive fitness theory has been of little value inExpand
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Conditional Manipulation of Sex Ratios by Ant Workers: A Test of Kin Selection Theory
Variable queen mating frequencies provide a unique opportunity to study the resolution of worker-queen conflict over sex ratio in social Hymenoptera, because the conflict is maximal in coloniesExpand
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The expression and impact of antifungal grooming in ants
Parasites can cause extensive damage to animal societies in which many related individuals frequently interact. In response, social animals have evolved diverse individual and collective defences.Expand
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Genetic analysis of the breeding system of an invasive subterranean termite, Reticulitermes santonensis, in urban and natural habitats
Reticulitermes santonensis is a subterranean termite that invades urban areas in France and elsewhere where it causes damage to human‐built structures. We investigated the breeding system, colony andExpand
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MICROSATELLITES REVEAL HIGH POPULATION VISCOSITY AND LIMITED DISPERSAL IN THE ANT FORMICA PARALUGUBRIS
We used microsatellites to study the fine‐scale genetic structure of a highly polygynous and largely unicolonial population of the ant Formica paralugubris. Genetic data indicate that long‐distanceExpand
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Sex–ratio regulation: the economics of fratricide in ants
In many insect societies, workers can manipulate the reproductive output of their colony by killing kin of lesser value to them. For instance, workers of the mound–building Formica exsecta eliminateExpand
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Nestmate recognition and the genetic relatedness of nests in the ant Formica pratensis
Genetic relatedness of the mound-building ant Formica pratensis was determined by means of microsatellite DNA polymorphism, and its impact on nestmate recognition was tested in a population inExpand
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Unicoloniality, recognition and genetic differentiation in a native Formica ant
Some ants have an extraordinary form of social organization, called unicoloniality, whereby individuals mix freely among physically separated nests. This mode of social organization has beenExpand
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INBREEDING AND SEX-BIASED GENE FLOW IN THE ANT FORMICA EXSECTA
Abstract The objective of this study was to assess breeding and dispersal patterns of both males and females in a monogyne (a single queen per colony) population of ants. Monogyny is commonlyExpand
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