• Publications
  • Influence
Water on Mars
  • M. Carr
  • Geology, Physics
    Nature
  • 1 March 1987
Estimates of the amount of water outgassed from Mars, based on the composition of the atmosphere, range from 6 to 160 m, as compared with 3 km for the Earth. In contrast, large flood features, valley
Water on Mars
  • M. Carr
  • Geology, Physics
    Nature
  • 1 March 1987
Estimates of the amount of water outgassed from Mars, based on the composition of the atmosphere, range from 6 to 160 m, as compared with 3 km for the Earth. In contrast, large flood features, valley
Formation of Martian flood features by release of water from confined aquifers
  • M. Carr
  • Geology, Environmental Science
  • 10 June 1979
It is proposed that the rapid release of water under great pressure from deeply buried aquifers is responsible for the formation of the Martian channels suggestive of catastrophic flooding (outflow
The Martian drainage system and the origin of valley networks and fretted channels
Outflow channels provide strong evidence for abundant water near the Martian surface and an extensive groundwater system. Collapse of the surface into some channels suggests massive subsurface
Martian impact craters and emplacement of ejecta by surface flow
Several types of Martian impact craters have been recognized. The most common type, the rampart crater, is distinctively different from lunar and Mercurian craters. It is typically surrounded by
Tectonic Processes on Europa: Tidal Stresses, Mechanical Response, and Visible Features
Abstract Europa's orbital eccentricity, driven by the resonance with Io and Ganymede, results in “diurnal” tides (3.5-day period) and possibly in nonsynchronous rotation. Both diurnal variation and
Martian drainage densities
Drainage densities on Mars range from zero over large areas of volcanic plains to 0.3–0.5 km−1 locally on some volcanoes. These values refer to geologic units, not to drainage basins, as is normal
Retention of an atmosphere on early Mars
  • M. Carr
  • Physics, Environmental Science
  • 25 September 1999
The presence of valley networks and indications of high erosion rates in ancient terrains on Mars suggest that Mars was warm and wet during heavy bombardment. Various processes that could occur on
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