• Publications
  • Influence
Why Machine-Information Metaphors are Bad for Science and Science Education
Genes are often described by biologists using metaphors derived from computational science: they are thought of as carriers of information, as being the equivalent of “blueprints” for theExpand
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The Fake, the Flimsy, and the Fallacious: Demarcating Arguments in Real Life
Philosophers of science have given up on the quest for a silver bullet to put an end to all pseudoscience, as such a neat formal criterion to separate good science from its contenders has provenExpand
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The Implications of the Cognitive Sciences for the Relation Between Religion and Science Education: The Case of Evolutionary Theory
This paper discusses the relationship between religion and science education in the light of the cognitive sciences. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible, a viewExpand
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Dealing with creationist challenges. What European biology teachers might expect in the classroom
Creationists are becoming more active in Europe. We expect that European biology teachers will be more frequently challenged by students who introduce creationist misconceptions of evolutionaryExpand
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Parasites of the mind. Why cultural theorists need the meme’s eye view
TLDR
We show that certain systems of misbelief can be fruitfully treated as cultural parasites, which are designed by cultural evolution and which subvert the interests of their human hosts. Expand
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Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem
What sets the practice of rigorously tested, sound science apart from pseudoscience? In this volume, the contributors seek to answer this question, known to philosophers of science as "theExpand
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The mismeasure of machine: Synthetic biology and the trouble with engineering metaphors.
  • M. Boudry, M. Pigliucci
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Studies in history and philosophy of biological…
  • 1 December 2013
The scientific study of living organisms is permeated by machine and design metaphors. Genes are thought of as the "blueprint" of an organism, organisms are "reverse engineered" to discover theirExpand
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Disbelief in belief: On the cognitive status of supernatural beliefs
Abstract Religious people seem to believe things that range from the somewhat peculiar to the utterly bizarre. Or do they? According to a new paper by Neil Van Leeuwen, religious “credence” isExpand
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Fakers, fanatics, and false dilemmas: Reply to Van Leeuwen
TLDR
In our critique of Neil Van Leeuwen’s theory on religious credence, we argued that, by and large, religious believers factually believe what they profess to believe, mainly because it does not display “wide cognitive governance” and is only activated within religious settings. Expand
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Immunizing Strategies and Epistemic Defense Mechanisms
An immunizing strategy is an argument brought forward in support of a belief system, though independent from that belief system, which makes it more or less invulnerable to rational argumentationExpand
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