M Fernanda Ceriani

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The circadian oscillator generates a rhythmic output with a period of about 24 hours. Despite extensive studies in several model systems, the biochemical mode of action has not yet been demonstrated for any of its components. Here, the Drosophila CLOCK protein was shown to induce transcription of the circadian rhythm genes period and timeless. dCLOCK(More)
Most organisms have circadian clocks consisting of negative feedback loops of gene regulation that facilitate adaptation to cycles of light and darkness. In this study, CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), a protein involved in circadian photoperception in Drosophila, is shown to block the function of PERIOD/TIMELESS (PER/TIM) heterodimeric complexes in a light-dependent(More)
In Drosophila, a number of key processes such as emergence from the pupal case, locomotor activity, feeding, olfaction, and aspects of mating behavior are under circadian regulation. Although we have a basic understanding of how the molecular oscillations take place, a clear link between gene regulation and downstream biological processes is still missing.(More)
Previous work in Drosophila has defined two populations of circadian brain neurons, morning cells (M-cells) and evening cells (E-cells), both of which keep circadian time and regulate morning and evening activity, respectively. It has long been speculated that a multiple oscillator circadian network in animals underlies the behavioral and physiological(More)
Clock output pathways are central to convey timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems, ranging from cell-autonomous processes to behavior. While the molecular mechanisms that generate and sustain rhythmicity at the cellular level are well understood, it is unclear how this information is further structured to(More)
BACKGROUND Circadian rhythms regulate physiology and behavior through transcriptional feedback loops of clock genes running within specific pacemaker cells. In Drosophila, molecular oscillations in the small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) command rhythmic behavior under free-running conditions releasing the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) in a(More)
Circadian rhythms allow organisms to time biological processes to the most appropriate phases of the day-night cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation is emerging as an important component of circadian networks, but the molecular mechanisms linking the circadian clock to the control of RNA processing are largely unknown. Here we show that PROTEIN ARGININE(More)
Daily cycles of rest and activity are a common example of circadian control of physiology. In Drosophila, rhythmic locomotor cycles rely on the activity of 150-200 neurons grouped in seven clusters [1, 2]. Work from many laboratories points to the small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) as essential for circadian control of locomotor rhythmicity [3-7]. sLNv(More)
The neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) synchronizes molecular oscillations within circadian pacemakers in the Drosophila brain. It is expressed in the small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) and large ventral lateral neurons, the former being indispensable for maintaining behavioral rhythmicity under free-running conditions. How PDF circuits develop(More)
Over the years it has become clear that the biological clock acts at different levels, ranging from the control of gene expression, protein stability, or subcellular localization of key proteins, to the fine tuning of network properties and modulation of input signals, ultimately ensuring that the organism will be best synchronized to a changing environment(More)