M. Carey Satterfield

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Embryonic loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are significant problems in humans and other animals. Results from studies involving pigs and sheep have indicated that limited uterine capacity and placental insufficiency are major factors contributing to suboptimal reproduction in mammals. Our discovery of the unusual abundance of the arginine(More)
In species with noninvasive implantation by conceptus trophectoderm, fetal/maternal communications occur across the endometrial epithelia. The present studies identified changes in junctional complexes in the ovine endometrium that regulate paracellular trafficking of water, ions, and other molecules, and the secretory capacity of the uterine epithelia.(More)
The global incidence of human obesity has more than doubled over the past three decades. An ovine model of obesity was developed to determine effects of maternal obesity and arginine supplementation on maternal, placental, and fetal parameters of growth, health, and well being. One-hundred-twenty days prior to embryo transfer, ewes were fed either ad(More)
Intrauterine growth restriction is a significant problem worldwide, resulting in increased rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risks for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. The present study investigated the role of maternal undernutrition and l-arginine administration on fetal growth and development. Embryo transfer was(More)
Morphological differentiation of uterine glands in mammals is a postnatal event vulnerable to adverse effects of endocrine disruptors. Exposure of ewe lambs to a progestin from birth to postnatal day 56 prevents development of uterine glands and, as adults, the ewes are unable to exhibit estrous cycles or maintain pregnancy. Uterine epithelia secrete(More)
The safety of HIV-1 based vectors was evaluated during the production of transgenic sheep. Vectors were introduced into the perivitelline space of in vivo derived one-cell sheep embryos by microinjection then transferred into the oviducts of recipient females. At 60–70 days of gestation, a portion of the recipients were euthanized and tissues collected from(More)
Inadequate delivery of nutrients results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in livestock. In ruminants, inadequate nutrition during pregnancy is often prevalent due to frequent utilization of exensive forage based grazing systems, making them highly susceptible to changes in nutrient(More)
Provide the following information for the key personnel and other significant contributors in the order listed on Form Page 2. DINDOT EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, and include postdoctoral training.) My laboratory in interested in understanding the molecular, genetic and epigenetic(More)
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