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Early interactions between lung dendritic cells (LDCs) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, are thought to be critical for mounting a protective anti-mycobacterial immune response and for determining the outcome of infection. However, these interactions are poorly understood, at least at the molecular level. Here we show(More)
A critical feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), is its ability to survive and multiply within macrophages, making these host cells an ideal niche for persisting microbes. Killing the intracellular tubercle bacilli is a key requirement for efficient tuberculosis treatment, yet identifying potent inhibitors(More)
New chemotherapeutics active against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are urgently needed. We report on the identification of an adamantyl urea compound that shows potent bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis and a unique mode of action, namely the abolition of the translocation of mycolic acids from the cytoplasm, where they are(More)
Genetic construction of a mutant strain (designated MSMEG4245) of Mycobacterium smegmatis, defective in a broadly conserved gene for a putative glycosyltransferase of the glycosyltransferase-C superfamily, results in a phenotype marked by the virtual absence of the phosphatidylinositol-containing lipomannan and lipoarabinomannan, replaced instead by a novel(More)
This evidence-based clinical practice guideline is a revision of the 2004 acute otitis media (AOM) guideline from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and American Academy of Family Physicians. It provides recommendations to primary care clinicians for the management of children from 6 months through 12 years of age with uncomplicated AOM. In 2009, the(More)
The role of biofilms in the pathogenesis of mycobacterial diseases remains largely unknown. Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, a disfiguring disease in humans, adopts a biofilm-like structure in vitro and in vivo, displaying an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) that harbors vesicles. The composition and structure of the ECM(More)
Several human pathogens are to be found within the bacterial genus Mycobacterium, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, one of the most threatening of human infectious diseases, with an annual lethality of about two million people. The characteristic mycobacterial cell envelope is the dominant feature of the biology of M.(More)
The cell envelope of pathogenic mycobacteria is highly distinctive in that it contains a large number of structurally related very long multiple methyl-branched fatty acids. These complex molecules are thought to play important roles in cell envelope organization and virulence. The genetic and enzymic characterization of the polyketide synthase Mas, which(More)
BACKGROUND The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes two peptide transporters encoded by Rv3665c-Rv3662c and Rv1280c-Rv1283c. Both belong to the family of ABC transporters containing two nucleotide-binding subunits, two integral membrane proteins and one substrate-binding polypeptide. However, little is known about their functions in M. tuberculosis.(More)
The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis highlights the need for identifying new antitubercular drugs that can treat these infections. The antigen 85 (Ag85) complex has emerged as an intriguing mycobacterial drug target due to its central role in synthesizing major components of the inner and outer leaflets of the mycobacterial outer(More)