Mårgareta Jennische

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The Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH) posits that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) can be largely explained by abnormalities of brain structures that subserve procedural memory. The PDH predicts impairments of procedural memory itself, and that such impairments underlie the grammatical deficits observed in the disorder. Previous studies have indeed(More)
It has been proposed that an impairment of procedural memory underlies a range of linguistic, cognitive and motor impairments observed in developmental dyslexia (DD). However, studies designed to test this hypothesis using the implicit sequence learning paradigm have yielded inconsistent results. A fundamental aspect of procedural learning is that it takes(More)
AIM To study language development at age 6.5 y in 230 children who had required neonatal intensive care (NIC) and 71 full-term neonatally healthy control children, all born in 1986-1989, with a focus on comparison between genders. METHODS Eight aspects of spontaneous speech, 3 fine motor functions, 10 linguistic areas, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and(More)
Spontaneous speech at age 6.5 years was studied separately in a follow-up of speech and language skills in a regional cohort of 284 children requiring neonatal intensive care and in 40 controls. Eight aspects of spontaneous speech were evaluated in a conversation: A1, information; A2, speech motor function; A3, sound pattern; A4, word finding; A5, word(More)
UNLABELLED Linguistic skills at 6 1/2 y of age, corrected for gestational age at birth, were examined in a cohort of 230 children who had required neonatal intensive care (NIC) in 1986-89, and in 71 fullterm neonatally healthy control children (C) matched to the NIC children born at < 32 gestational weeks. Ten linguistic areas were assessed. The 10th(More)
Developmental dyslexia (DD) has previously been associated with a number of cognitive deficits. Little attention has been directed to cognitive functions that remain intact in the disorder, though the investigation and identification of such strengths might be useful for developing new, and improving current, therapeutical interventions. In this study, an(More)
UNLABELLED Spontaneous speech at 6 1/2 y of age was studied in a follow-up of 230 children born in 1986-89 who had required neonatal intensive care (NIC) and 71 fullterm neonatally healthy control children. Eight aspects of spontaneous speech were examined: Information, speech motor function, sound pattern, word finding, word selection, grammar, interaction(More)
Speech and language skills at 6.5 y of age were studied in a follow-up of a cohort of children who had required neonatal intensive care (NIC) at Uppsala University Children's Hospital. An interview with the parents indicated that preterm and full-term NIC children were older than control children when they reached certain stages in language development(More)
We studied expressive and receptive language, oral motor ability, attention, memory, and intelligence in 20 6-year-old children with epilepsy (14 females, six males; mean age 6y 5mo, range 6y-6y 11mo) without learning disability, cerebral palsy (CP), and/or autism, and in 30 reference children without epilepsy (18 females, 12 males; mean age 6y 5mo, range(More)
Linguistic skills at 6 1/2 y of age were examined in a cohort of 284 children requiring neonatal intensive care (NIC) and in 40 controls. Ten linguistic areas were assessed. The results are presented for gestational age groups. The 10th percentile score of the controls was identified in each linguistic area. Seventy percent of the controls and <27% of the(More)