Lynnette Brammer

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Seasonal influenza epidemics are a major public health concern, causing tens of millions of respiratory illnesses and 250,000 to 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. In addition to seasonal influenza, a new strain of influenza virus against which no previous immunity exists and that demonstrates human-to-human transmission could result in a pandemic with(More)
CONTEXT Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Statistical methods used to estimate deaths in the United States attributable to influenza have not accounted for RSV circulation. OBJECTIVE To develop a statistical model using national mortality and viral surveillance data to estimate annual influenza- and(More)
CONTEXT Respiratory viral infections are responsible for a large number of hospitalizations in the United States each year. OBJECTIVE To estimate annual influenza-associated hospitalizations in the United States by hospital discharge category, discharge type, and age group. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data(More)
BACKGROUND Age-specific comparisons of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization rates can inform prevention efforts, including vaccine development plans. Previous US studies have not estimated jointly the burden of these viruses using similar data sources and over many seasons. METHODS We estimated influenza and RSV hospitalizations(More)
CONTEXT During the 2007-2008 influenza season, oseltamivir resistance among influenza A(H1N1) viruses increased significantly for the first time worldwide. Early surveillance data suggest that the prevalence of oseltamivir resistance among A(H1N1) viruses will most likely be higher during the 2008-2009 season. OBJECTIVES To describe patients infected with(More)
To calculate the burden of 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) in the United States, we extrapolated from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infections Program laboratory-confirmed hospitalizations across the entire United States, and then corrected for underreporting. From 12 April 2009 to 10 April 2010, we estimate that approximately(More)
BACKGROUND A wide range of methods have been used for estimating influenza-associated deaths in temperate countries. Direct comparisons of estimates produced by using different models with US mortality data have not been published. OBJECTIVE Compare estimates of US influenza-associated deaths made by using four models and summarize strengths and(More)
In April 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed 2 cases of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in children from southern California, marking the beginning of what would be the first influenza pandemic of the twenty-first century. This report describes the epidemiology of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic in the United States,(More)
OBJECTIVE Pediatric influenza-associated death became a nationally notifiable condition in the United States during 2004. We describe influenza-associated pediatric mortality from 2004 to 2007, including an increase of Staphylococcus aureus coinfections. METHODS Influenza-associated pediatric death is defined as a death of a child who is younger than 18(More)
During August 2011, influenza A (H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] virus infection developed in a child who attended an agricultural fair in Pennsylvania, USA; the virus resulted from reassortment of a swine influenza virus with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. We interviewed fair attendees and conducted a retrospective cohort study among members of an agricultural club who(More)