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Introduction Prevalence is an indicator of primary interest in public health because it measures the burden of cancer in a population and on the health care system. Prevalence is defined as the number or percent of people alive on a certain date in a population who previously had a diagnosis of the disease. It includes new (incidence) and pre-existing cases(More)
BACKGROUND The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. This year's report highlights brain and other nervous(More)
BACKGROUND Annual updates on cancer occurrence and trends in the United States are provided through collaboration between the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR). This year's report highlights the(More)
BACKGROUND The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide information on cancer rates and trends in the United States. This year's report updates statistics on the 15 most(More)
BACKGROUND Public concern about possible increases in childhood cancer incidence in the United States led us to examine recent incidence and mortality patterns. METHODS Cancers diagnosed in 14540 children under age 15 years from 1975 through 1995 and reported to nine population-based registries in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance,(More)
The current status of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) among U.S. females was reviewed with the use of data abstracted from medical records of patients diagnosed with breast cancer between 1975 and 1981 in nine geographic areas covered by the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Patients were selected on(More)
BACKGROUND The American Cancer Society, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updated information regarding cancer occurrence and trends in the United States. This year's report includes trends in(More)
BACKGROUND Accurate estimates of cancer survival are important for assessing optimal patient care and prognosis. Evaluation of these estimates via relative survival (a ratio of observed and expected survival rates) requires a population life table that is matched to the cancer population by age, sex, race and/or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and ideally(More)
BACKGROUND In 2010, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries began collecting human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor status for breast cancer cases. METHODS Breast cancer subtypes defined by joint hormone receptor (HR; estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PR]) and HER2 status were assessed across the 28% of the(More)
Reporting of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMDs) to population-based cancer registries in the United States was initiated in 2001. In this first analysis of data from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), encompassing 82% of the US population, we evaluated trends in MDS and CMD(More)