Lucy P. Evans

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  • Chi-Hsiu Liu, Ye Sun, +7 authors Jing Chen
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences…
  • 2015
Pathologic ocular neovascularization commonly causes blindness. It is critical to identify the factors altered in pathologically proliferating versus normally quiescent vessels to develop effective targeted therapeutics. MicroRNAs regulate both physiological and pathological angiogenesis through modulating expression of gene targets at the(More)
BACKGROUND Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a vision-threatening disease in premature infants. Serum adiponectin (APN) concentrations positively correlate with postnatal growth and gestational age, important risk factors for ROP development. Dietary ω-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LCPUFAs) suppress ROP and oxygen-induced retinopathy(More)
Regeneration of blood vessels in ischemic neuronal tissue is critical to reduce tissue damage in diseases. In proliferative retinopathy, initial vessel loss leads to retinal ischemia, which can induce either regrowth of vessels to restore normal metabolism and minimize damage, or progress to hypoxia-induced sight-threatening pathologic vaso-proliferation.(More)
Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found(More)
OBJECTIVE Regulation of angiogenesis is critical for many diseases. Specifically, pathological retinal neovascularization, a major cause of blindness, is suppressed with dietary ω3-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3LCPUFAs) through antiangiogenic metabolites of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases (CYP2C8) also metabolize(More)
Neurons and glial cells in the retina contribute to neovascularization, or the formation of abnormal new blood vessels, in proliferative retinopathy, a condition that can lead to vision loss or blindness. We identified a mechanism by which suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in neurons and glial cells prevents neovascularization. We found that Socs3(More)
Angiogenesis of the microvasculature is central to the etiology of many diseases including proliferative retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and cancer. A mouse model of microvascular angiogenesis would be very valuable and enable access to a wide range of genetically manipulated tissues that closely approximate small blood vessel growth in vivo.(More)
Two hundred sixty tracheas were obtained from a Philadelphia abattoir under permit from the Department of Agriculture; the tracheas were excised from predominantly Holstein calves of both sexes that weighed approximately 250 kg. Tracheas were transported in normal saline to the laboratory at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Evidence(More)
Jean-Sébastien Joyal, Ye Sun, Marin L Gantner, Zhuo Shao, Lucy P Evans, Nicholas Saba, Thomas Fredrick, Samuel Burnim, Jin Sung Kim, Gauri Patel, Aimee M Juan, Christian G Hurst, Colman J Hatton, Zhenghao Cui, Kerry A Pierce, Patrick Bherer, Edith Aguilar, Michael B Powner, Kristis Vevis, Michel Boisvert, Zhongjie Fu, Emile Levy, Marcus Fruttiger, Alan(More)
The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of(More)