Lowell W. Fritz

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Since the mid-1970s, the western Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus), inhabiting Alaskan waters from Prince William Sound west through the Aleutian Islands, has declined by over 80%. Changing oceanographic conditions, competition from fishing operations, direct human-related mortality, and predators have been suggested as factors driving the decline, but(More)
Fertilization in the marine red algaAntithamnion nipponicum is a highly specific process involving non-motile male gametes, spermatia, and female receptive structures, carpogonia. FITC-lectin and Calcofluor white ST labelling show that the outer cell walls of spermatia differ from vegetative cells in carbohydrate composition. Specific binding of the lectins(More)
Springer et al. (2003) contend that sequential declines occurred in North Pacific populations of harbor and fur seals, Steller sea lions, and sea otters. They hypothesize that these were due to increased predation by killer whales, when industrial whaling’s removal of large whales as a supposed primary food source precipitated a prey switch. Using a(More)
Genetic studies and differing population trends support the separation of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) into a western distinct population segment (WDPS) and an eastern DPS (EDPS) with the dividing line between populations at 144° W. Despite little exchange for thousands of years, the gap between the breeding ranges narrowed during the past 15-30(More)
A mark–recapture experiment was conducted in Seguam Pass, Alaska, to estimate local Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) abundance and to evaluate the efficacy of trawl exclusion zones around Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) rookeries. Atka mackerel were found in dense aggregations near the Aleutian Islands where they are a major prey item of(More)
Total harvest, bycatch, catch utilization, and discards are currently the subjects of considerable attention and debate worldwide. This report documents reported catch, bycatch, utilization, and discard data and attempts to identify patterns and trends in the commercial groundfish fisheries of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA), eastern Bering Sea, and Aleutian(More)
Over the past three decades, the decline and altered spatial distribution of the western stock of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in Alaska have been attributed to changes in the distribution or abundance of their prey due to the cumulative effects of fisheries and environmental perturbations. During this period, dietary prey occurrence and diet(More)
Springer et al. (2003) contend that sequential declines occurred in North Pacific populations of harbor and fur seals, Steller sea lions, and sea otters. They hypothesize that these were due to increased predation by killer whales, when industrial whaling’s removal of large whales as a supposed primary food source precipitated a prey switch. Using a(More)