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  • L L Elliott
  • 1979
Performance of children aged 9 to 17 years on the SPIN test (Speech Perception in Noise) is described. The 11- and 13-year-olds performed significantly poorer than 15- and 17-year-olds, and this difference occurred primarily for high-predictability sentences presented at a O-dB signal-to-babble ratio. Performance of nine-year-olds was significantly poorer(More)
Two groups of children--one progressing normally in school and the other exhibiting language-learning problems--were tested in each of 3 years on a set of fine-grained auditory discrimination tasks that required listening for small acoustic differences. Children's ages ranged from 6 to 9 years; there were 21 children per group. The children with(More)
A four-alternative, forced choice adaptive procedure was used to measure the lowest intensity at which children could identify monosyllabic nouns that had been standardized to be understandable (at comfortable listening levels) to inner city, 3-year-old children. Results showed no age-related performance changes when the words were presented against a(More)
In a longitudinal study of attachment, children (N = 147) aged 50 and 61 months heard their mother and a stranger make conflicting claims. In 2 tasks, the available perceptual cues were equally consistent with either person's claim but children generally accepted the mother's claims over those of the stranger. In a 3rd task, the perceptual cues favored the(More)
Two large groups of children--one progressing normally in school and the other exhibiting language-learning problems--were tested on a set of fine-grained auditory discrimination tasks that required responding to small acoustic differences. Discriminant analysis procedures, using only results for the auditory tasks, correctly classified nearly 80% of the 6-(More)
The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether age-related differences would be observed for identification and discrimination of synthesized, five-formant CV syllables among listeners who showed equal performance scores on a standard clinical test of speech understanding. A second question concerned the relations between performance on(More)
  • L L Elliott
  • 1975
Relatively few experimental investigations have studied backward or forward masking, masking level differences, or differential frequency effects in simultaneous masking among persons with hearing impairment. This is regrettable since such efforts may lead to important new understandings of auditory processes. This paper reviews available data, discusses(More)
Ability to utilize auditory contextual information to facilitate speech-recognition verbal auditory closure is postulated to be a specific factor or primary mental ability, separable from general intelligence or other mental functions. This paper proposes that measurement of verbal auditory closure provides useful clinical information. Because the Speech(More)