Loris L. Ferrari

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Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) are an important component of the ascending arousal system and may form part of a "flip-flop switch" hypothesized to regulate sleep and wakefulness. Anatomical studies have shown that the wake-active TMN and sleep-active ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) are reciprocally connected, suggesting(More)
Work in animals and humans has suggested the existence of a slow wave sleep (SWS)-promoting/electroencephalogram (EEG)-synchronizing center in the mammalian lower brainstem. Although sleep-active GABAergic neurons in the medullary parafacial zone (PZ) are needed for normal SWS, it remains unclear whether these neurons can initiate and maintain SWS or EEG(More)
Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic(More)
Interaction between the basal ganglia and the cortex plays a critical role in a range of behaviors. Output from the basal ganglia to the cortex is thought to be relayed through the thalamus, but an intriguing alternative is that the basal ganglia may directly project to and communicate with the cortex. We explored an efferent projection from the globus(More)
The orexin (hypocretin) neurons play an essential role in promoting arousal, and loss of the orexin neurons results in narcolepsy, a condition characterized by chronic sleepiness and cataplexy. The orexin neurons excite wake-promoting neurons in the basal forebrain (BF), and a reciprocal projection from the BF back to the orexin neurons may help promote(More)
Work in animals and humans suggest the existence of a slow–wave sleep (SWS) promoting/EEG synchronizing center in the mammalian lower brainstem. While sleep–active GABAergic neurons in the medullary parafacial zone (PZ) are needed for normal SWS, it remains unclear if these neurons can initiate and maintain SWS or EEG slow wave activity (SWA) in behaving(More)
The precise neural circuitry that mediates arousal during sleep apnea is not known. We previously found that glutamatergic neurons in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBel) play a critical role in arousal to elevated CO2 or hypoxia. Because many of the PBel neurons that respond to CO2 express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), we hypothesized(More)
Currently available evidence indicates that neurons containing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus are critical modulators of sleep-wakefulness, but their precise role in this function is not clear. Studies employing optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons have yielded inconsistent results, presumably due to differences in the(More)
Basic and clinical observations suggest that the caudal hypothalamus comprises a key node of the ascending arousal system, but the cell types underlying this are not fully understood. Here we report that glutamate-releasing neurons of the supramammillary region (SuMvglut2) produce sustained behavioral and EEG arousal when chemogenetically activated. This(More)
KEY POINTS The basal forebrain is an important component of the ascending arousal system and may be a key site through which the orexin neurons promote arousal. It has long been known that orexin-A and -B excite basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but orexin-producing neurons also make the inhibitory peptide dynorphin. Using whole-cell recordings in brain(More)