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Hybridization is frequent in many organismal groups, but its role in adaptation is poorly understood. In sunflowers, species found in the most extreme habitats are ancient hybrids, and new gene combinations generated by hybridization are speculated to have contributed to ecological divergence. This possibility was tested through phenotypic and genomic(More)
The origin of new homoploid species via hybridization is theoretically difficult because it requires the development of reproductive isolation in sympatry. Nonetheless , this mode is often and carelessly used by botanists to account for the formation of species that are morphologically intermediate with respect to related congeners. Here, I review(More)
Polyploidy, the doubling of genomic content, is a widespread feature, especially among plants, yet its macroevolutionary impacts are contentious. Traditionally, polyploidy has been considered an evolutionary dead end, whereas recent genomic studies suggest that polyploidy has been a key driver of macroevolutionary success. We examined the consequences of(More)
Hybridization is a prominent process among natural plant populations that can result in phenotypic novelty, heterosis, and changes in gene expression. The effects of intraspecific hybridization on F1 hybrid gene expression were investigated using parents from divergent, natural populations of Cirsium arvense, an invasive Compositae weed. Using an RNA-seq(More)
UNLABELLED PREMISE OF THE STUDY The Compositae (Asteraceae) are a large and diverse family of plants, and the most comprehensive phylogeny to date is a meta-tree based on 10 chloroplast loci that has several major unresolved nodes. We describe the development of an approach that enables the rapid sequencing of large numbers of orthologous nuclear loci to(More)
  • Zhao Lai, Takuya Nakazato, Marzia Salmaso, John M Burke, Shunxue Tang, Steven J Knapp +1 other
  • 2005
New species may arise via hybridization and without a change in ploidy. This process, termed homoploid hybrid speciation, is theoretically difficult because it requires the development of reproductive barriers in sympatry or parapatry. Theory suggests that isolation may arise through rapid karyotypic evolution and/or ecological divergence of hybrid(More)
Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are abundant and frequently highly polymorphic in transcribed sequences and widely targeted for marker development in eukaryotes. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) transcript assemblies were built and mined to identify SSRs and insertions-deletions (INDELs) for marker development, comparative mapping, and other genomics(More)
Can the complex phenotypes that characterize naturally occurring hybrid species be re-created in early-generation artificial hybrids? We address this question with three homoploid hybrid species (Helianthus anomalus, Helianthus deserticola, Helianthus paradoxus) and their ancestral parents (Helianthus annuus, Helianthus petiolaris) that are phenotypically(More)