Lois H. Thomas

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OBJECTIVE To determine if repetitive task training after stroke improves functional activity. DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis of trials comparing repetitive task training with attention control or usual care. DATA SOURCES The Cochrane Stroke Trials Register, electronic databases of published, unpublished and non-English language papers;(More)
BACKGROUND Given the current emphasis on networks as vehicles for innovation and change in health service delivery, the ability to conceptualize and measure organisational enablers for the social construction of knowledge merits attention. This study aimed to develop a composite tool to measure the organisational context for evidence-based practice (EBP) in(More)
BACKGROUND Urinary incontinence (UI) affects half of patients hospitalised after stroke and is often poorly managed. Cochrane systematic reviews have shown some positive impact of conservative interventions (such as bladder training) in reducing UI, but their effectiveness has not been demonstrated with stroke patients. METHODS We conducted a cluster(More)
BACKGROUND Urinary incontinence following acute stroke is common, affecting between 40%-60% of people in hospital after a stroke. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for urinary incontinence and urinary incontinence after stroke, national audit data suggest incontinence is often poorly managed. Conservative interventions (e.g. bladder training,(More)
BACKGROUND The implementation of strategies to monitor and enhance treatment fidelity is of paramount importance in trials of complex interventions. A recent framework published by the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium recommends addressing five areas of treatment fidelity, one of which is delivery of treatment. This study aimed to(More)
In common with many cluster-randomised trials, it was difficult to determine the appropriate sample size for the planned trial of the effectiveness of a systematic voiding programme for post-stroke incontinence due to the lack of a robust estimate of the intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC). One approach to overcome this problem is a method of(More)
Background: Urinary incontinence (UI) affects half of patients hospitalised after stroke and is often poorly managed. Cochrane systematic reviews have shown some positive impact of conservative interventions (such as bladder training) in reducing UI, but their effectiveness has not been demonstrated with stroke patients. Methods: We conducted a cluster(More)
Objective To evaluate design and implementation issues in an NIHR-funded feasibility trial of the management of urinary incontinence after stroke in a secondary care setting. Methods Twelve stroke services were cluster-randomised to 3 intervention groups (systematic voiding programme with/without supported implementation; usual care) in 4 strata based on:(More)
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