Lodewijk Bos

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  • L. Bos
  • Archives of Virology
  • 1999
Science aims to describe reality for the reliable storage and retrieval of information, and to allow trustworthy communication and efficacy of human interference. This requires precision with respect to the identification of organisms, objects, and phenomena; in short, of any item, so that we know what we are talking about. Precision must be optimal, for(More)
  • L. Bos
  • Archives of Virology
  • 2000
In a recent paper in this periodical (Archives of Virology) I have expressed my disquiet about current developments in the naming of viruses, particularly the orthography of virus names, that is, their structure and typography (way of writing) [1]. Since then, two reactions have appeared. The first and very brief one (by Dr. Van Regenmortel) [7] did not(More)
  • L. Bos
  • Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology
  • 2005
Three new legume diseases in The Netherlands are described:Wisteria vein mosaic, pea necrosis, and pea leafroll mosaic. In particle size and morphology and in host reaction the virus isolates resembled bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV), but they were readily distinguishable in several test plants. In recent years several new legume viruses related to BYMV and(More)
Biological testing of 974 leaf samples of wild and cultivated Umbelliferae in the Netherlands yielded 569 virus isolates; 550 could be classified into 19 viruses, two of them with two strains each. Viruses frequently occurred in mixtures, and infection often was symptomless. Anthriscus carlavirus and caraway latent virus are tentatively described as new(More)
One of the faba bean viruses found in West Asia and North Africa was identified as broad bean mottle virus (BBMV) by host reactions, particle morphology and size, serology, and granular, often vesiculated cytoplasmic inclusions. Detailed research on four isolates, one each from Morocco, Tunisia, Sudan and Syria, provided new information on the virus. The(More)
A new carlavirus, apparently omnipresent in shallot (Allium ascalonicum) without causing symptoms, is described as shallot latent virus. It has also been detected in naturally infected onion (A. cepa) and leek (A. porrum). The virus was easily transmissible in sap and could be transferred withMyzus ascalonicus. Infection after inoculation was symptomless in(More)
  • L. Bos
  • Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology
  • 2005
At various sites on three grids with crude-sap preparations of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), electron micrographs were made and per photograph 50–200 particles were measured. Calculated average lengths turned out to differ up to 4% according to the site photographed. Calculated lengths appeared to depend on potentiometer settings required for focussing. This(More)
Two sap-transmissible virus isolates from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were identified as bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) on the basis of particle size and morphology, serology, non-persistent aphid transmission, very limited host range, and symptoms and seed transmission in bean. In bean varietal reaction both isolates differed from each other and all six(More)
  • L. Bos
  • Archives of Virology
  • 1995
Occasions, such as the recent appearance of the Encyclopedia of Virology, provide an opportunity to reconsider the discipline's roots and to critically reexamine the past. In plant pathology, Mayer [20], Ivanovsky [9] and Beijerinck [ 1] have, for their classical investigations on tobacco mosaic published between 1886 and 1898, for long been considered to(More)
A total of 52 faba-bean (Vicia faba L.) fields, located in the main growing areas in Morocco were surveyed for viruses. From 240 samples with symptoms suggestive of virus infection, the following viruses were detected using electron microscopy, serology, and biological indexing: Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV), broad bean mottle(More)