Ljubica D. Caldovic

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N -Acetylglutamate (NAG) fulfils distinct biological roles in lower and higher organisms. In prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes and plants it is the first intermediate in the biosynthesis of arginine, whereas in ureotelic (excreting nitrogen mostly in the form of urea) vertebrates, it is an essential allosteric cofactor for carbamyl phosphate synthetase I(More)
The transcriptional regulatory elements of the β-actin gene of carp (Cyprinus carpio) have been examined in zebrafish and goldfish harbouring transgenes. The high sequence conservation of the putative regulatory elements in the β-actin genes of animals suggested that their function would be conserved, so that transgenic constructs with the same(More)
The crystal structures of N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) in the arginine biosynthetic pathway of Neisseria gonorrhoeae complexed with acetyl-CoA and with CoA plus N-acetylglutamate have been determined at 2.5- and 2.6-A resolution, respectively. The monomer consists of two separately folded domains, an amino acid kinase (AAK) domain and an(More)
Hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC) is a rare hereditary leukoencephalopathy that was originally identified by MRI pattern analysis, and it has thus far defied all attempts at identifying the causal mutation. Only 22 cases are published in the literature to date. We performed exome sequencing on five family trios, two(More)
N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an endogenous essential cofactor for conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver. Deficiency of NAG causes hyperammonemia and occurs because of inherited deficiency of its producing enzyme, NAG synthase (NAGS), or interference with its function by short fatty acid derivatives. N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) can ameliorate hyperammonemia(More)
In ureotelic animals, N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI), the first enzyme in the urea cycle. NAG synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1) catalyses the formation of NAG from glutamate and acetyl-CoA in liver and intestinal mitochondria. This enzyme is supposed to regulate ureagenesis by producing(More)
N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder, is the last urea cycle disorder for which molecular testing became available. This is the first comprehensive report of 21 mutations that cause NAGS deficiency and of commonly found polymorphisms in the NAGS gene. Five mutations are reported here for the first time. A total of 10(More)
N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is a unique cofactor that is essential for the conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver. N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the formation of NAG. Deficiency of NAGS causes a block in ureagenesis resulting in hyperammonemia. Although a number of mutations have been identified in the NAGS gene, their effects on NAGS(More)
N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate, an essential allosteric activator of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. Liver NAGS deficiency has previously been found in a small number of patients with hyperammonemia. The mouse and human NAGS genes have(More)
N-Acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, E.C. 2.3.1.1) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI). The mouse and human NAGS genes have been identified based on similarity to regions of NAGS from Neurospora crassa and cloned from liver cDNA libraries.(More)