Ljubica Caldovic

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In ureotelic animals, N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI), the first enzyme in the urea cycle. NAG synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1) catalyses the formation of NAG from glutamate and acetyl-CoA in liver and intestinal mitochondria. This enzyme is supposed to regulate ureagenesis by producing(More)
BACKGROUND In microorganisms and plants, the first two reactions of arginine biosynthesis are catalyzed by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) and N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK). In mammals, NAGS produces an essential activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I, the first enzyme of the urea cycle, and no functional NAGK homolog has been found. Unlike the(More)
The urea cycle converts toxic ammonia to urea within the liver of mammals. At least 6 enzymes are required for ureagenesis, which correlates with dietary protein intake. The transcription of urea cycle genes is, at least in part, regulated by glucocorticoid and glucagon hormone signaling pathways. N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) produces a unique(More)
BACKGROUND The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an(More)
The transcriptional regulatory elements of the beta-actin gene of carp (Cyprinus carpio) have been examined in zebrafish and goldfish harbouring transgenes. The high sequence conservation of the putative regulatory elements in the beta-actin genes of animals suggested that their function would be conserved, so that transgenic constructs with the same(More)
Here we report whole exome sequencing (WES) on a cohort of 71 patients with persistently unresolved white matter abnormalities with a suspected diagnosis of leukodystrophy or genetic leukoencephalopathy. WES analyses were performed on trio, or greater, family groups. Diagnostic pathogenic variants were identified in 35% (25 of 71) of patients. Potentially(More)
The conversion of ammonia into urea by the human liver requires the coordinated function of the 6 enzymes and 2 transporters of the urea cycle. The initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the urea cycle, carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), requires an allosteric activator, N-acetylglutamate (NAG). The formation of this unique cofactor from glutamate and(More)
OBJECTIVE Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient leukoencephalopathy is a complex II-related mitochondrial disorder for which the clinical phenotype, neuroimaging pattern, and genetic findings have not been comprehensively reviewed. METHODS Nineteen individuals with succinate dehydrogenase deficiency-related leukoencephalopathy were reviewed for(More)
N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS; E.C.2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate (NAG) from acetyl coenzyme A and glutamate. In microorganisms and plants, NAG is the first intermediate of the L-arginine biosynthesis; in animals, NAG is an allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I and III. In some bacteria bifunctional(More)
All knockout mouse models of urea cycle disorders die in the neonatal period or shortly thereafter. Since N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) deficiency in humans can be effectively treated with N-carbamyl-L-glutamate (NCG), we sought to develop a mouse model of this disorder that could be rescued by biochemical intervention, reared to adulthood, reproduce,(More)