Ljubica Caldovic

Learn More
The urea cycle converts toxic ammonia to urea within the liver of mammals. At least 6 enzymes are required for ureagenesis, which correlates with dietary protein intake. The transcription of urea cycle genes is, at least in part, regulated by glucocorticoid and glucagon hormone signaling pathways. N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) produces a unique(More)
BACKGROUND In microorganisms and plants, the first two reactions of arginine biosynthesis are catalyzed by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) and N-acetylglutamate kinase (NAGK). In mammals, NAGS produces an essential activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I, the first enzyme of the urea cycle, and no functional NAGK homolog has been found. Unlike the(More)
BACKGROUND The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an(More)
The conversion of ammonia into urea by the human liver requires the coordinated function of the 6 enzymes and 2 transporters of the urea cycle. The initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the urea cycle, carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1), requires an allosteric activator, N-acetylglutamate (NAG). The formation of this unique cofactor from glutamate and(More)
The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase(More)
  • 1