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[1] Boundary layer observations taken during the METCRAX field study in October of 2006 near Winslow in Northern Arizona revealed the frequent presence of a near-surface wind maximum on nights with relatively quiescent synoptic conditions. Data from a sodar, a radar wind profiler, several surface stations, and frequent high-resolution rawinsonde soundings(More)
  • Liz Savage
  • 2009
that women should be clearly informed of these harms in order to make their own choice about whether to attend for screening. " Writing in the British Medical Journal , of the Nordic Cochrane Center in Copenhagen, and colleagues singled out the NHS and its breast cancer screening pamphlet as an example. The researchers cri-tiqued the current pamphlet,(More)
  • Liz Savage
  • 2007
A fter decades of searching for a replacement for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer screening, many researchers are once again examining variations on the long-beleaguered biomarker. PSA has withstood years of skepticism from critics who blame it for the overdiag-nosis and overtreatment of millions of men since it became the favorite(More)
  • Liz Savage
  • 2007
A new product on the market in a handful of U.S. cities has stirred up mixed feelings in the public-health community. Known as snus (rhymes with " goose "), it is a smokeless tobacco product that has been used in Sweden for nearly a century. Because it has lower levels of cancer-causing tox-ins than cigarettes or other smokeless tobacco products that are(More)
V ivek Malhotra fi rst began studying protein secretion in the late 1980s, and he has spent most of his career since then trying to unlock the secrets of secretion and in particular the organization of the Golgi complex. In doing so, Malhotra has developed a true passion for the scientifi c process. As a postdoc at Stanford, Malhotra made some signifi cant(More)
A s a grad student at the University of Chicago, Bryan Krantz became interested in how proteins fold (1, 2). But as a postdoc at Harvard (with John Collier), Krantz stopped folding proteins, and started unfolding them instead. In particular, he started unfolding anthrax toxin (3). Most people might think twice before handling anthrax toxin, let alone(More)
  • Liz Savage
  • 2007
F or the last 9 years, the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp has come to the rescue of breast cancer researchers in need of funding. Now a new program introduced by the National Cancer Institute narrows the focus of the research funded by the stamp but asks bigger questions. The proceeds from the stamp are now funneled into the breast cancer(More)
Spring gardens will soon bloom with an abundance of flowering plants—from cultivated roses to hillside wildflowers. The diversity among flowering plants is remarkable , and even within a single plant, you find an assortment of shapes and sizes. Plant organs—leaves and petals, for in-stance—clearly have distinct forms and functions and are subject to(More)
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