Lisandro J. González

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Accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli is of utmost importance for the control of nosocomial spread and the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The modified Hodge test (MHT), a carbapenem inactivation assay, has shown poor sensitivity in detecting the worldwide spread of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM). Recent(More)
Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, a Gram-negative rod widely distributed in the environment, is resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics. Three bla genes have been identified in E. meningoseptica, coding for the extended-spectrum serine-β-lactamase CME (class D) and two unrelated wide-spectrum metallo-β-lactamases, BlaB (subclass B1) and GOB (subclass B3). E.(More)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most virulent and resistant non-fermenting Gram-negative pathogens in the clinic. Unfortunately, P. aeruginosa has acquired genes encoding metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs), enzymes able to hydrolyze most β-lactam antibiotics. SPM-1 is an MβL produced only by P. aeruginosa, while other MβLs are found in different bacteria.(More)
Metallo-beta-lactamases (MbetaLs) are zinc enzymes able to hydrolyze almost all beta-lactam antibiotics, rendering them inactive, at the same time endowing bacteria high levels of resistance. The design of inhibitors active against all classes of MbetaLs has been hampered by their structural diversity and by the heterogeneity in metal content in enzymes(More)
Carbapenems, 'last-resort' β-lactam antibiotics, are inactivated by zinc-dependent metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The host innate immune response withholds nutrient metal ions from microbial pathogens by releasing metal-chelating proteins such as calprotectin. We show that metal sequestration is detrimental for the accumulation of MBLs in the bacterial(More)
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