Lisa Schneper

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Cell-size homeostasis entails a fundamental balance between growth and division. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae establishes this balance by enforcing growth to a critical cell size prior to cell cycle commitment (Start) in late G1 phase. Nutrients modulate the critical size threshold, such that cells are large in rich medium and small in poor(More)
Addition of glucose to yeast cells increases their growth rate and results in a massive restructuring of their transcriptional output. We have used microarray analysis in conjunction with conditional mutations to obtain a systems view of the signaling network responsible for glucose-induced transcriptional changes. We found that several well-studied(More)
Addition of glucose to starved yeast cells elicits a dramatic restructuring of the transcriptional and metabolic state of the cell. While many components of the signaling network responsible for this response have been identified, a comprehensive view of this network is lacking. We have used global analysis of gene expression to assess the roles of the(More)
Tor proteins, targets of the antiinflammatory drug rapamycin, mediate a conserved signaling pathway required for cell growth and proliferation in eukaryotes. By global transcriptional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have examined the role of the essential protein Tap42 in transcriptional regulation by Tor. We find that Tap42 inactivation, like(More)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of(More)
In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ras proteins connect nutrient availability to cell growth through regulation of protein kinase A (PKA) activity. Ras proteins also have PKA-independent functions in mitosis and actin repolarization. We have found that mutations in MOB2 or CBK1 confer a slow-growth phenotype in a ras2Delta background. The slow-growth phenotype of(More)
Yeast cells respond to the quantity and quality of carbon and nitrogen sources in the environment both by adjusting their transcriptional and metabolic profiles to make optimum use of the available nutrients and by selecting a developmental program--budding, pseudohyphal differentiation, quiescence or sporulation--that maximizes their potential for survival(More)
In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC,(More)
Microbial communities play vital roles in many aspects of our lives, although our understanding of microbial biogeography and community profiles remains unclear. The number of microbes or the diversity of the microbes, even in small environmental niches, is staggering. Current microbiological methods used to analyse these communities are limited, in that(More)
Cac3p/Msi1p, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of retinoblastoma-associated protein 48 (RbAp48), is a component of chromatin assembly factor I (CAF-I), a complex that assembles histones H3 and H4 onto replicated DNA. CAC3 overexpression also suppresses the RAS/cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction pathway by an unknown mechanism. We investigated this(More)