Lisa A. Chase

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Before the discovery of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), the glutamate analogue L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (L-AP4) was identified as a potent presynaptic inhibitor of evoked synaptic transmission in the lateral perforant pathway in rats. The localization and L-AP4 sensitivity of the mGluR4a subtype of mGluRs were consistent with the(More)
A brief exposure of hippocampal slices to L-quisqualic acid (QUIS) sensitizes CA1 pyramidal neurons 30- to 250-fold to depolarization by certain excitatory amino acids analogues, e.g., L-2-amino-6-phosphonohexanoic acid (L-AP6), and by the endogenous compound, L-cystine. This phenomenon has been termed QUIS sensitization. A mechanism similar to that(More)
L-Glutamic acid (L-Glu) and L-aspartic acid (L-Asp) activate several receptor subtypes, including metabotropic Glu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. Quisqualic acid (Quis) is the most potent agonist of these receptors. There is evidence that activation of these receptors may cause a long lasting sensitization of neurons to(More)
A brief exposure of hippocampal slices to L-quisqualic acid sensitizes CA1 pyramidal neurons 30-250-fold to depolarization by two classes of excitatory amino acid analogues: (1) those whose depolarizing effects are rapidly terminated following washout, e.g. L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (L-AP4) and L-2-amino-6-phosphonohexanoic acid (L-AP6) and (2)(More)
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