Linda S. Steelman

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Growth factors and mitogens use the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade to transmit signals from their receptors to regulate gene expression and prevent apoptosis. Some components of these pathways are mutated or aberrantly expressed in human cancer (e.g., Ras, B-Raf). Mutations also occur at genes encoding upstream receptors (e.g., EGFR and Flt-3) and(More)
The roles of the JAK/STAT, Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways and the BCR-ABL oncoprotein in leukemogenesis and their importance in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis are discussed in this review. These pathways have evolved regulatory proteins, which serve to limit their proliferative and antiapoptotic effects. Small(More)
The PI3K/Akt signal transduction cascade has been investigated extensively for its roles in oncogenic transformation. Initial studies implicated both PI3K and Akt in prevention of apoptosis. However, more recent evidence has also associated this pathway with regulation of cell cycle progression. Uncovering the signaling network spanning from extracellular(More)
The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR cascades are often activated by genetic alterations in upstream signaling molecules such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Integral components of these pathways, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K, and PTEN are also activated/inactivated by mutations. These pathways have profound effects on proliferative, apoptotic and(More)
The Ras/Raf/Mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade couples signals from cell surface receptors to transcription factors, which regulate gene expression. Depending upon the stimulus and cell type, this pathway can transmit signals, which result in the prevention or induction of apoptosis or cell(More)
The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/AKT signaling cascades play critical roles in the transmission of signals from growth factor receptors to regulate gene expression and prevent apoptosis. Components of these pathways are mutated or aberrantly expressed in human cancer (e.g., Ras, B-Raf, PI3K, PTEN, Akt). Also, mutations occur at genes encoding upstream(More)
Dysregulated signaling through the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathways is often the result of genetic alterations in critical components in these pathways or upstream activators. Unrestricted cellular proliferation and decreased sensitivity to apoptotic-inducing agents are typically associated with activation of these pro-survival pathways. This(More)
Mutations and chromosomal translocations occur in leukemic cells that result in elevated expression or constitutive activation of various growth factor receptors and downstream kinases. The Raf/MEK/ERK, PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT pathways are often activated by mutations in upstream genes. The Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathways are regulated(More)
Since the discovery of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) over a decade ago, many of their critical biological properties have been elucidated, including their distinct replicative properties, cell surface phenotypes, their increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and the involvement of growth-promoting chromosomal translocations. Of particular importance is(More)
It has become apparent that regulation of protein translation is an important determinant in controlling cell growth and leukemic transformation. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is often implicated in sensitivity and resistance to therapy.(More)