Linda C. Robinson

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Abnormal TDP-43 aggregation is a prominent feature in the neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Mutations in TARDBP, the gene encoding TDP-43, cause some cases of ALS. The normal function of TDP-43 remains incompletely understood. To better understand TDP-43 biology, we generated mutant mice carrying a(More)
Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Alternative splicing of the tau gene (MAPT) generates six tau isoforms, distinguishable by the exclusion or inclusion of a repeat region of exon 10, which are referred to as 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau, respectively. We developed transgenic mouse models that express(More)
Genes Kcna1 and Kcna2 code for the voltage-dependent potassium channel subunits Kv1.1 and Kv1.2, which are coexpressed in large axons and commonly present within the same tetramers. Both contribute to the low-voltage-activated potassium current I Kv1, which powerfully limits excitability and facilitates temporally precise transmission of information, e.g.,(More)
Proteolytic cleavage of tau at glutamic acid 391 (E391) is linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This C-terminal-truncated tau species exists in neurofibrillary tangles and abnormal neurites in the brains of AD patients and may potentiate tau polymerization. We generated a mouse model that expresses human tau truncated at E391 to begin to(More)
Genes Kcna1 and Kcna2 code for the voltage-dependent potassium channel subunits Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 which are co-expressed in large axons and commonly present within the same tetramers. Both contribute to the low-voltage-activated potassium current I Kv1 which powerfully limits excitability and facilitates temporally precise transmission of information, e.g. in(More)
INTRODUCTION Accumulation of insoluble conformationally altered hyperphosphorylated tau occurs as part of the pathogenic process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. In most AD subjects, wild-type (WT) tau aggregates and accumulates in neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites in the brain; however, in some familial tauopathy disorders,(More)
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