Linda B. Couto

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We have previously shown that a single portal vein infusion of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) expressing canine Factor IX (F.IX) resulted in long-term expression of therapeutic levels of F.IX in dogs with severe hemophilia B. We carried out a phase 1/2 dose-escalation clinical study to extend this approach to humans with severe(More)
Hemophilia B is a severe X-linked bleeding diathesis caused by the absence of functional blood coagulation factor IX, and is an excellent candidate for treatment of a genetic disease by gene therapy. Using an adeno-associated viral vector, we demonstrate sustained expression (>17 months) of factor IX in a large-animal model at levels that would have a(More)
Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors (serotype 2) efficiently transduce skeletal muscle, and have been used as gene delivery vehicles for hemophilia B and for muscular dystrophies in experimental animals and humans. Recent reports suggest that AAV vectors based on serotypes 1, 5, and 7 transduce murine skeletal muscle much more efficiently than AAV-2, with(More)
Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors allow for sustained expression of transgene products from mouse liver following a single portal vein administration. Here a rAAV vector expressing human coagulation factor F.IX (hF.IX), AAV-EF1alpha-F.IX (hF.IX expression was controlled by the human elongation factor 1alpha [EF1alpha] enhancer-promoter) was(More)
Pre-clinical studies in mice and haemophilic dogs have shown that introduction of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding blood coagulation factor IX (F.IX) into skeletal muscle results in sustained expression of F.IX at levels sufficient to correct the haemophilic phenotype. On the basis of these data and additional pre-clinical studies(More)
Hemophilia B is an X-linked coagulopathy caused by absence of functional coagulation factor IX (F.IX). Previously, we established an experimental basis for gene transfer as a method of treating the disease in mice and hemophilic dogs through intramuscular injection of a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector expressing F.IX. In this study we(More)
Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (AAV) were prepared in high titer (10(12) to 10(13) particles/mL) for the expression of human factor IX after in vivo transduction of murine hepatocytes. Injection of AAV-CMV-F.IX (expression from the human cytomegalovirus IE enhancer/promoter) into the portal vein of adult mice resulted in no detectable human(More)
In a clinical study of recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 expressing human factor IX (AAV2-FIX), we detected 2 impediments to long-term gene transfer. First, preexisting anti-AAV neutralizing antibodies (NABs) prevent vector from reaching the target tissue, and second, CD8(+) T-cell responses to hepatocyte-cell surface displayed AAV-capsid-terminated FIX(More)
A potential consequence of systemic administration of viral vectors is the inadvertent introduction of foreign DNA into recipient germ cells. To evaluate the safety of in vivo recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) mediated gene transfer approaches for hemophilia B, we explored the risk of germline transmission of vector sequences following intramuscular(More)
Hemophilia A, a deficiency of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), is treated via protein replacement therapy. Restoring 1% to 5% of normal blood FVIII activity prevents spontaneous bleeding, making the disease an attractive gene therapy target. Previously, we have demonstrated short-term activity of a liver-specific AAV2 vector expressing canine(More)