Lenore C Terr

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  • L C Terr
  • The American journal of psychiatry
  • 1991
Childhood psychic trauma appears to be a crucial etiological factor in the development of a number of serious disorders both in childhood and in adulthood. Like childhood rheumatic fever, psychic trauma sets a number of different problems into motion, any of which may lead to a definable mental condition. The author suggests four characteristics related to(More)
  • L C Terr
  • The American journal of psychiatry
  • 1983
A 4-year follow-up study of 25 school-bus kidnapping victims and one child who narrowly missed the experience revealed that every child exhibited posttraumatic effects. Symptom severity was related to the child's prior vulnerabilities, family pathology, and community bonding. Important new findings included pessimism about the future, belief in omens and(More)
  • L C Terr
  • The American journal of psychiatry
  • 1981
Twenty-three children involved in a school-bus kidnapping were studied from 5 to 13 months following the event. Each child suffered posttraumatic emotional sequelae. The author found that the children suffered from initial misperceptions, early fears of further trauma, hallucinations, and "omen" formation. Later they experienced posttraumatic symptoms(More)
OBJECTIVE The Challenger space shuttle explosion in January 1986 offered an opportunity to determine what, if any, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and bereavement normal latency-age children and adolescents would develop after a distant, horrifying event. METHOD With a structured interview, the authors assessed the symptoms of 153(More)
  • L C Terr
  • The Psychiatric clinics of North America
  • 1985
The term childhood trauma has been well-accepted and frequently used since the turn of the twentieth century, yet until the early 1980s the condition itself was barely described and minimally explained. This article covers the current definitions and then critically reviews the literature, emphasizing the most recent studies on childhood trauma. It then(More)
  • L C Terr
  • Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic
  • 1992
Large group counseling sessions for soldiers following battle have been commonly used since World War II. The author conceptualizes and demonstrates how these mini-marathon sessions can be adapted to support all ages and types of civilians involved in disasters. Mini-marathons take about 3 hours and are divided into three sections: story sharing, symptom(More)