Lea P. McDaniel

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The mutagenic heterocyclic aromatic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), is a pyrolysis product in cooked foods that has been shown to be a rat colon carcinogen and has been implicated in the etiology of human colon cancer. In order to identify chemoprotection strategies that could be carried out in humans, a pilot study was(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells, and carcinogenic in rodents. The recent discovery of AA at ppm levels in a wide variety of commonly consumed foods has energized research efforts worldwide to define toxic mechanisms, particularly toxicokinetics and bioavailability. This study(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells, and carcinogenic in rodents. The recent discovery of AA at ppm levels in a wide variety of commonly consumed foods has energized research efforts worldwide to define toxic mechanisms, particularly toxicokinetics and bioavailability. This study(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is an animal carcinogen, neurotoxin, and reproductive toxin. AA is formed in baked and fried carbohydrate-rich foods. Metabolism of AA occurs via epoxidation to glycidamide (GA) or direct conjugation with glutathione. Using CYP2E1-null mice, recent studies in this laboratory demonstrated that induction of somatic and germ cell mutagenicity(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells, and carcinogenic in chronic rodent bioassays. Recent findings of AA in many common starchy foods have sparked renewed interest in determining toxic mechanisms and in understanding the cancer, neurotoxicity, and reproductive risks from typical human(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines(More)
Furan, a potent rodent liver carcinogen, is found in many cooked food items and thus represents a human cancer risk. Mechanisms for furan carcinogenicity were investigated in male F344 rats using the in vivo Comet and micronucleus assays, combined with analysis of histopathological and gene expression changes. In addition, formamidopyrimidine DNA(More)
Acrylamide (AA) is a widely studied industrial chemical that is neurotoxic, mutagenic to somatic and germ cells and carcinogenic in rodents. AA is also formed in many commonly consumed starchy foods during cooking. Our previous toxicokinetic investigations of AA and its important genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide (GA), in rodents showed that AA is highly(More)
The recent discovery of acrylamide (AA), a probable human carcinogen, in a variety of fried and baked starchy foods has drawn attention to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Evidence suggests that glycidamide (GA), the epoxide metabolite of AA, is responsible for the genotoxic effects of AA. To investigate the in vivo genotoxicity of AA, groups of male(More)
Furan is a multispecies liver carcinogen whose cancer mode of action (MOA) is unclear. A major metabolite of furan is a direct acting mutagen; however, it is not known if genotoxicity is a key step in the tumors that result from exposure to furan. In order to address this question, transgenic Big Blue rats were treated by gavage five times a week for 8(More)