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BACKGROUND Refined sugars (e.g., sucrose, fructose) were absent in the diet of most people until very recently in human history. Today overconsumption of diets rich in sugars contributes together with other factors to drive the current obesity epidemic. Overconsumption of sugar-dense foods or beverages is initially motivated by the pleasure of sweet taste(More)
BACKGROUND Assessing the relative value of cocaine and how it changes with chronic drug use represents a long-standing goal in addiction research. Surprisingly, recent experiments in rats--by far the most frequently used animal model in this field--suggest that the value of cocaine is lower than previously thought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS Here we(More)
Epidemiological research shows that the proportion of drug users who become addicted to heroin is higher than to cocaine. Here we tested whether this difference could be due to a difference in the addiction liability between the two drugs. Addiction liability was assessed under a discrete-trials choice procedure by measuring the proportion of rats that(More)
Assessing the relative reward value of cocaine and how it changes with repeated use represents a long-standing goal in addiction research. Surprisingly, recent experimental research in rats – the most frequently used animal model in the field – suggests that the reward value of cocaine may in fact be relatively weak at least in the majority of individuals.(More)
Ample evidence shows that the setting can control drug choices in both humans and animals. Here we reveal in rats that a major mechanism of this control involves a regulation of the drug influence on other competing options at the time of choice. Briefly, rats were offered a choice between a drug dose (cocaine or heroin) and a brief access to water(More)
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