Laurence H. Pearl

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Hsp90 (heat shock protein of 90 kDa) is a ubiquitous molecular chaperone responsible for the assembly and regulation of many eukaryotic signalling systems and is an emerging target for rational chemotherapy of many cancers. Although the structures of isolated domains of Hsp90 have been determined, the arrangement and ATP-dependent dynamics of these in the(More)
Gastropod mollusks have been used for over 2500 years to produce the "Tyrian purple" dye made famous by the Phoenicians. This dye is constituted of mixed bromine-substituted indigo and indirubin isomers. Among these, the new natural product 6-bromoindirubin and its synthetic, cell-permeable derivative, 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO), display remarkable(More)
Hsp90 molecular chaperones in eukaryotic cells play essential roles in the folding and activation of a range of client proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, steroid hormone responsiveness, and signal transduction. The biochemical mechanism of Hsp90 is poorly understood, and the involvement of ATP in particular is controversial. Crystal structures of(More)
Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone essential for activating many signaling proteins in the eukaryotic cell. Biochemical and structural analysis of Hsp90 has revealed a complex mechanism of ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins, which facilitate activation of Hsp90's diverse "clientele." Despite(More)
Client protein activation by Hsp90 involves a plethora of cochaperones whose roles are poorly defined. A ubiquitous family of stress-regulated proteins have been identified (Aha1, activator of Hsp90 ATPase) that bind directly to Hsp90 and are required for the in vivo Hsp90-dependent activation of clients such as v-Src, implicating them as cochaperones of(More)
Hsp90 is an abundant molecular chaperone essential to the establishment of many cellular regulation and signal transduction systems, but remains one of the least well described chaperones. The biochemical mechanism of protein folding by Hsp90 is poorly understood, and the direct involvement of ATP has been particularly contentious. Here we demonstrate in(More)
The in vivo function of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) molecular chaperone is dependent on the binding and hydrolysis of ATP, and on interactions with a variety of co-chaperones containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. We have now analysed the interaction of the yeast TPR-domain co-chaperones Sti1 and Cpr6 with yeast Hsp90 by isothermal(More)
How the ATPase activity of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is coupled to client protein activation remains obscure. Using truncation and missense mutants of Hsp90, we analysed the structural implications of its ATPase cycle. C-terminal truncation mutants lacking inherent dimerization displayed reduced ATPase activity, but dimerized in the presence of(More)
CHIP is a dimeric U box E3 ubiquitin ligase that binds Hsp90 and/or Hsp70 via its TPR-domain, facilitating ubiquitylation of chaperone bound client proteins. We have determined the crystal structure of CHIP bound to an Hsp90 C-terminal decapeptide. The structure explains how CHIP associates with either chaperone type and reveals an unusual asymmetric(More)
Activation of client proteins by the Hsp90 molecular chaperone is dependent on binding and hydrolysis of ATP, which drives a molecular clamp via transient dimerization of the N-terminal domains. The crystal structure of the middle segment of yeast Hsp90 reveals considerable evolutionary divergence from the equivalent regions of other GHKL protein family(More)