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Peptide signaling presumably occupies a central role in plant development, yet only few concrete examples of receptor-ligand pairs that act in the context of specific differentiation processes have been described. Here we report that second-site null mutations in the Arabidopsis leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase gene barely any meristem 3 (BAM3)(More)
A central question in developmental biology is how multicellular organisms coordinate cell division and differentiation to determine organ size. In Arabidopsis roots, this balance is controlled by cytokinin-induced expression of SHORT HYPOCOTYL 2 (SHY2) in the so-called transition zone of the meristem, where SHY2 negatively regulates auxin response factors(More)
Secondary growth of the vasculature results in the thickening of plant structures and continuously produces xylem tissue, the major biological carbon sink. Little is known about the developmental control of this quantitative trait, which displays two distinct phases in Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls. The later phase of accelerated xylem expansion resembles(More)
• BREVIS RADIX (BRX) has been identified through a loss-of-function allele in the Umkirch-1 accession in a natural variation screen for Arabidopsis root growth vigor. Physiological and gene expression analyses have suggested that BRX is rate limiting for auxin-responsive gene expression by mediating cross-talk with the brassinosteroid pathway, as impaired(More)
Secondary growth of the vasculature results in the thickening of plant structures and continuously produces xylem tissue, the major biological carbon sink. Little is known about the developmental control of this quantitative trait, which displays two distinct phases in Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls. The later phase of accelerated xylem expansion resembles(More)
Among various advantages, their small size makes model organisms preferred subjects of investigation. Yet, even in model systems detailed analysis of numerous developmental processes at cellular level is severely hampered by their scale. For instance, secondary growth of Arabidopsis hypocotyls creates a radial pattern of highly specialized tissues that(More)
Background Can Arabidopsis research contribute to our understanding about wood development? Does the function of vascular cambium in a herbaceous weed resemble that of a tree? Despite its diminutive size as compared to a tree, Arabidopsis still displays cambial driven secondary thickening in several organs, including the hypocotyl. Hypocotyl is a good model(More)
Quantification of vascular morphodynamics during secondary growth has been hampered by the scale of the process. Even in the tiny model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the xylem can include more than 2000 cells in a single cross section, rendering manual counting impractical. Moreover, due to its deep location, xylem is an inaccessible tissue, limiting live(More)
Secondary growth occurs in dicotyledons and gymnosperms, and results in an increased girth of plant organs. It is driven primarily by the vascular cambium, which produces thousands of cells throughout the life of several plant species. For instance, even in the small herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis, manual quantification of this massive process is(More)
The continuous production of vascular tissues through secondary growth results in radial thickening of plant organs and is pivotal for various aspects of plant growth and physiology, such as water transport capacity or resistance to mechanical stress. It is driven by the vascular cambium, which produces inward secondary xylem and outward secondary phloem.(More)