Laura E Pickard

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BACKGROUND Knowledge translation (KT) research in long-term care (LTC) is still in its early stages. This protocol describes the evaluation of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary KT intervention aimed at integrating evidence-based osteoporosis and fracture prevention strategies into LTC care processes. METHODS AND DESIGN The Vitamin D and Osteoporosis Study(More)
Our purpose was to identify factors for a parsimonious fracture risk assessment model considering morphometric spine fracture status, femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) and the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical risk factors. Using data from 2761 subjects from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), a prospective, longitudinal cohort(More)
BACKGROUND To investigate the association between frailty index (FI) of deficit accumulation and risk of falls, fractures, death and overnight hospitalizations in women aged 55 years and older. METHODS The data were from the Global Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) Hamilton Cohort. In this 3-year longitudinal, observational cohort study,(More)
BACKGROUND Few studies have systematically examined whether knowledge translation (KT) strategies can be successfully implemented within the long-term care (LTC) setting. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary KT intervention for improving the prescribing of vitamin D, calcium and osteoporosis medications over(More)
BACKGROUND The risk factors associated with fractures have been well-characterized in community dwelling populations, but have not been clearly defined in long-term care (LTC) settings. The objective of this review was to identify risk factors for fractures in LTC settings. METHODS We searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June(More)
Background Information: Limited research has suggested that rural residents are at increased risk of dementia. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if rural residence is associated with dementia using both cross-sectional and prospective analyses. Methods: In 1991, 1763 community-dwelling adults aged 65+ participated in the Manitoba Study(More)
Background/Purpose: The 85+-year-old population – the " oldest old " – is now the fastest growing age segment in Canada. Although existing research demonstrates high health services utilization and prescribed medications in this population , little epidemiological evidence is available to guide care for this age group. Objective: To describe the(More)
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