Larry D . Howery

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We tested the hypothesis that cattle aided by visual cues would be more efficient than uncued animals in locating and consuming foods placed in either fixed or variable locations within a 0.64-ha experimental pasture. Eight yearling steers were randomly selected and trained to Ž . Ž . associate traffic barricades and traffic cones with highoat–barley(More)
Wild and domestic ungulates modify their behaviour in the presence of olfactory and visual cues of predators but investigations have not exposed a domestic species to a series of cues representing various predators and other ungulate herbivores. We used wolf (Canis lupus), mountain lion (Puma concolor), and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) stimuli (olfactory(More)
USDA-APHIS-WS-National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA b School of Natural Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA Dept. of Natural Resources Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA USFWS, Mexican Wolf Project, 2105 Osuna NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113, USA Arizona GameFish Department,(More)
Social learning can be of critical importance to cattle grazing rangeland environments with high variability of food resources across space and time. Experienced individuals can greatly facilitate foraging decisions (what to eat and where to eat) of naïve peers in such settings. We conducted an experiment with cattle to investigate strength and persistence(More)
Wild and domestic ungulates modify their behaviour in the presence of olfactory and visual cues of predators but investigations have not exposed a domestic species to a series of cues representing various predators and other ungulate herbivores. We used wolf (Canis lupus), mountain lion (Puma concolor), and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) stimuli (olfactory(More)
Animal learning has been shown to play a major role in the development of diet selection by domestic ungulates. Dr. Frederick Provenza and his associates at Utah State University have conducted a series of experiments over the past 15 years to learn how physiological and behavioral mechanisms govern diet selection. In this paper, we synthesize several key(More)
This paper reviews the literature and reports on the current state of knowledge regarding the potential for managers to use visual (VC), auditory (AC) and olfactory (OC) cues to manage foraging behaviour and spatial distribution of rangeland livestock. We present evidence that free-ranging livestock use these sensory cues to make decisions about foraging,(More)