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Spread of the tiger: global risk of invasion by the mosquito Aedes albopictus.
TLDR
A genetic algorithm is used, Genetic Algorithm for Rule Set Production (GARP), to determine the ecological niche of Ae.
Invasions by insect vectors of human disease.
TLDR
Propagule pressure, previous success, and adaptations to human habits appear to favor successful invasions by vectors, such as anthropophilic fleas, lice, kissing bugs, and mosquitoes.
Ecology of invasive mosquitoes: effects on resident species and on human health.
TLDR
This review focuses on the ecological interactions operating during invasions by the most prominent group of insect vectors of disease, mosquitoes, focusing on the best-studied invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus, and develops a model based on observations for effects of resource competition and predation as barriers to invasion.
Does temperature affect the outcome of larval competition between Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?
TLDR
It is predicted that by itself, temperatures between 24 degrees and 30 degrees C would not alter the outcome of larval competition, and response measures of Aedes albopictus were more sensitive than those of Ae.
Convergent Habitat Segregation of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Southeastern Brazil and Florida
TLDR
Analyses of frequencies of occurrence showed an unexpected high level of co-occurrence of both species in the same oviposition trap, despite the different geographical origins of Ae.
Asymmetric Evolution of Photoperiodic Diapause in Temperate and Tropical Invasive Populations of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the spread of A. albopictus in Florida from more temperate USA has been associated with a gradual loss of diapause, such that diappause incidence is now positively correlated with latitude in the southern USA.
A field test for competitive effects of Aedes albopictus on A. aegypti in South Florida: differences between sites of coexistence and exclusion?
TLDR
Although competition from A. albopictus is strong under field conditions at all sites, it is found no evidence that variation in the impact of interspecific competition is associated with coexistence or exclusion, and interspecific competition among larvae is thus a viable explanation for exclusion or reduction of A. aegypti.
Interspecific Larval Competition Between Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Northern Virginia
Abstract Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes japonicus (Theobald) are two of the most recent and widespread invasive mosquito species to have become established in the United States. The two species
Dispersal of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in an urban endemic dengue area in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
TLDR
Results from this study suggest that females can fly at least 800 m in 6 days and, if infected, potentially spread virus rapidly, and that egg laying also occurred beyond these limits.
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