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Evidence against a dedicated system for word learning in children
TLDR
The findings show that fast mapping is not limited to word learning, suggesting that the capacity to learn and retain new words is the result of learning and memory abilities that are not specific to language.
Intention and Analogy in Children's Naming of Pictorial Representations
What underlies children's naming of representations, such as when they call a statue of a clothespin “a clothespin”? One possibility is that they focus exclusively on shape, extending the name
Children's Reliance on Creator's Intent in Extending Names for Artifacts
TLDR
3-year-olds' shape bias results from intuitions about what artifacts were intended to be, and only in the third condition did children overcome a shape bias in favor of a function bias when extending the name of the target object.
Children's avoidance of lexical overlap: a pragmatic account.
TLDR
The findings suggest that 3-year-olds' avoidance of lexical overlap is not unique to naming and may derive from children's sensitivity to speakers' communicative intentions.
The Child as Econometrician: A Rational Model of Preference Understanding in Children
TLDR
It is demonstrated that when children use statistical information to learn about preferences, their inferences match the predictions of a simple econometric model, and this model can explain children's ability to learn that other people have preferences similar to or different from their own.
Capacities underlying word learning
Children reason about shared preferences.
TLDR
Two-year-old children's reasoning about the relation between their own and others' preferences was investigated across two studies, suggesting that young children readily recognize when another person holds a preference similar to theirs and use that knowledge appropriately to achieve desired outcomes.
Similarity predicts liking in 3-year-old children.
The shape of thought.
TLDR
It is argued here for the second alternative, presenting evidence that the shape bias emerges early in development, is not limited to names, and is intimately related to how children make sense of categories.
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