• Publications
  • Influence
The Causes and Consequences of Ant Invasions
TLDR
Experimental studies and research focused on the native range ecology of invasive ants will be especially valuable contributions to this field of study.
Environmental and Economic Costs of Nonindigenous Species in the United States
TLDR
Aproximately 50,000 nonindigenous (non-native) species are estimated to have been introduced to the United States, many of which are beneficial but have caused major economic losses in agriculture, forestry, and several other segments of the US economy, in addition to harming the environment.
ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH NON-INDIGENOUS SPECIES IN THE UNITED STATES
TLDR
Invading non-indigenous species in the United States cause major environmental damages and losses adding up to more than $138 billion per year and about 42% of the species on the Threatened or Endangered species lists are at risk primarily because of non-Indigenous species.
Managing the whole landscape: historical, hybrid, and novel ecosystems
The reality confronting ecosystem managers today is one of heterogeneous, rapidly transforming landscapes, particularly in the areas more affected by urban and agricultural development. A landscape
Invasive Ants: Unwanted Partners in Ant-Plant Interactions?
TLDR
The potential for effects of invasive ants on plants to counteract, and the complexity and context-dependency that are hallmarks of ant-plant interactions generally, preclude drawing simple conclusions about the net impacts of invasive ant on plants.
Argentine ants displace floral arthropods in a biodiversity hotspot
TLDR
The displacement of floral arthropods by Argentine ants may have far-reaching consequences for this biodiversity hotspot and other regions that are rich in insect-pollinated plants.
Floral visitation patterns of two invasive ant species and their effects on other hymenopteran visitors
Abstract 1. Floral nectar of the native Hawaiian ‘ōhi’a tree, Metrosideros polymorpha, is an important food source for several native honeycreepers and yellow‐faced bees, Hylaeus spp., but is also
Interference and exploitation competition of three nectar-thieving invasive ant species
  • L. Lach
  • Biology
    Insectes Sociaux
  • 1 August 2005
TLDR
Compared the nectar-thieving behavior of three widespread invasive ant species in inflorescences of the native Hawaiian ‘ōhi’a tree, an important food source for native fauna, Anoplolepis gracilipes may be effective at both interference and exploitation competition against other nectarivores, L. humile and P. megacephala may be relatively weak at both types of competition.
A mutualism with a native membracid facilitates pollinator displacement by Argentine ants.
  • L. Lach
  • Biology, Medicine
    Ecology
  • 1 August 2007
TLDR
Though Argentine ants were not associated with a decline in P. nitida seed set or ovule predation, declines in generalist insect pollinators may have ramifications for the 83% of fynbos plants that are insect pollinated.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...