• Publications
  • Influence
The serial cultivation of human diploid cell strains.
TLDR
A consideration of the cause of the eventual degeneration of these strains leads to the hypothesis that non-cumulative external factors are excluded and that the phenomenon is attributable to intrinsic factors which are expressed as senescence at the cellular level. Expand
THE LIMITED IN VITRO LIFETIME OF HUMAN DIPLOID CELL STRAINS.
  • L. Hayflick
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Experimental cell research
  • 1 March 1965
TLDR
The survival curves obtained with human diploid cell strains are comparable to “multiple-hit” or “ multiple-target” curves obtain with other biological systems where an initial threshold dose is required before an exponential form of the curve is established. Expand
A potential decline in life expectancy in the United States in the 21st century.
TLDR
From an analysis of the effect of obesity on longevity, it is concluded that the steady rise in life expectancy during the past two centuries may soon come to an end. Expand
The future of ageing
TLDR
Determination of longevity must be distinguished from ageing to take us from the common question of why the authors age to a more revealing question that is rarely posed: why do they live as long as they do. Expand
How and why we age
  • L. Hayflick
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Experimental Gerontology
  • 2 August 1994
After performing the miracles that takes us from conception to birth, and then to sexual maturation and adulthood, natural selection was unable to favor the development of a more elementary mechanismExpand
Tissue cultures and mycoplasmas.
  • L. Hayflick
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Texas reports on biology and medicine
  • 1 June 1965
Entropy Explains Aging, Genetic Determinism Explains Longevity, and Undefined Terminology Explains Misunderstanding Both
  • L. Hayflick
  • Medicine, Biology
  • PLoS genetics
  • 1 December 2007
TLDR
The four aspects of the finitude of life: aging, the determinants of longevity, age-associated diseases, and death are defined for use in this editorial. Expand
Biological Aging Is No Longer an Unsolved Problem
  • L. Hayflick
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1 April 2007
TLDR
The belief that aging is still an unsolved problem in biology is no longer true and there is a continuing belief that the resolution of age‐associated diseases will advance the understanding of the fundamental aging process, but this will not. Expand
"Anti-aging" is an oxymoron.
  • L. Hayflick
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological…
  • 1 June 2004
No intervention will slow, stop, or reverse the aging process in humans. Whether anti-aging medicine is, or is not, a legitimate science is completely dependent upon the definition of key terms thatExpand
Growth on artificial medium of an agent associated with atypical pneumonia and its identification as a PPLO.
TLDR
Evidence is provided which firmly associates the agent first recovered by Eaton with lower respiratory tract illness of man and the demonstration that naturally acquired antibody offered protection against such illness supports the contention that the agent is a respiratory tract pathogen. Expand
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