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  • Influence
Design and the domestication of information and communication technologies: technical change and everyday life
Original citation: Originally published in Silverstone, Roger and Haddon, Leslie (1996) Design and the domestication of information and communication technologies: technical change and everyday life.Expand
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The Contribution of Domestication Research to In-Home Computing and Media Consumption
  • L. Haddon
  • Sociology, Computer Science
  • Inf. Soc.
  • 1 September 2006
TLDR
This article deals with the contribution made by domestication research to our understanding of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in everyday life, especially in the home. Expand
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EU Kids Online: final report 2009
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Risks and safety on the internet: the perspective ofEuropean children. Full findings.
This report, based on the final dataset of the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents for all 25 countries, presents the final full findings for EU Kids Online Deliverable D4: CoreExpand
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Domestication and Mobile Telephony
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Domestication Analysis, Objects of Study, and the Centrality of Technologies in Everyday Life
ABSTRACT  The article first introduces the domestication approach, its origins, its key elements, and its general contributions and limitations. It then examines ways in which the domesticationExpand
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EU kids online II: final report 2011
EU Kids Online aims to enhance knowledge of the experiences and practices of European children and parents regarding risky and safer use of the internet and new online technologies, in order toExpand
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Roger Silverstone’s legacies: domestication
  • L. Haddon
  • Computer Science, Sociology
  • New Media Soc.
  • 1 February 2007
TLDR
LSE has developed LSE Research Online so that users may access research output of the School. Expand
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Patterns of risk and safety online: in-depth analyses from the EU Kids Online survey of 9- to 16-year-olds and their parents in 25 European countries
This report presents the findings from statistical analyses for EU Kids Online Deliverable D5: Patterns of Risk and Safety Online to the European Commission Safer Internet Programme (August 2011).Expand
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